cloister

cloisterless, adj.cloisterlike, adj.
/kloy"steuhr/, n.
1. a covered walk, esp. in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade usually opening onto a courtyard.
2. a courtyard, esp. in a religious institution, bordered with such walks.
3. a place of religious seclusion, as a monastery or convent.
4. any quiet, secluded place.
5. life in a monastery or convent.
v.t.
6. to confine in a monastery or convent.
7. to confine in retirement; seclude.
8. to furnish with a cloister or covered walk.
9. to convert into a monastery or convent.
[1250-1300; ME cloistre < AF, OF, b. cloison partition (see CLOISONNÉ) and clostre ( < L claustrum barrier (LL: enclosed place); see CLAUSTRUM)]
Syn. 3. abbey, priory.

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Four-sided enclosure surrounded by covered walkways and usually attached to a monastic or cathedral church; also, the walkways themselves.

The earliest cloisters were open arcades, usually with sloping wooden roofs. This form was generally superseded in England by a range of windows lighting a vaulted ambulatory (aisle). In southern climates, the open-arcaded cloister remained standard. An especially fine example is Donato Bramante's two-story open arcade at Santa Maria della Pace, Rome (1500–4).

Open arcaded cloister of Saint-Trophîme, Arles, Fr.

Jean Roubier

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      quadrilateral enclosure surrounded by covered walkways, and usually attached to a monastic or cathedral church and sometimes to a college. The term used in a narrow sense also applies to the walkways or alleys themselves (the central area being the cloister garth), in a general sense to the houses of religious orders, and in a generic sense to places of retreat for religious purposes.

      A cloister is usually the area in a monastery around which the principal buildings are ranged, affording a means of communication between the buildings. In developed medieval practice, cloisters usually followed either a Benedictine or a Cistercian arrangement. In the Benedictine form, the church was located on one side of the cloister, with the refectory occupying the opposite side, so that the worshipers might be removed from kitchen noises and smells. The chapter house was placed on the eastern side, with other apartments adjacent to it and the dormitory usually occupying the entire upper story. On the western side, the cellarer's lodgings were generally located, near storehouses that held the community's provisions.

      In Cistercian monasteries the western side of the cloister was usually occupied by the two-story domus conversorum, or lodgings of the lay brothers, with their day rooms and workshops situated beneath the dormitory. The buildings generally stood on the south of the church to get as much sunshine as possible.

      The cloister of a religious house was the centre of activity for its inhabitants. There the younger members were educated and the elders studied. The west walk was traditionally, if unofficially, the place of educational instruction. The other walkways, especially the one next to the church, were devoted to the studies of the elder monks, and for this purpose small studies (known as carols, or carrels) were often built into the recesses of the windows. The cloister also served for exercise and general recreation, particularly in bad weather, and its central area and walkways were the customary places of burial.

      Larger monastic establishments commonly had more than one cloister; there was usually a second connected with the infirmary (e.g., at Westminster Abbey and Canterbury) and sometimes one giving access to the kitchen and other domestic offices. Cloisters were also attached to colleges of secular canons, as at the cathedrals of Lincoln, Salisbury, and Wells; and the colleges of Eton and Winchester, as well as New College and Magdalen College at Oxford, also have cloisters.

      The earliest cloisters consisted of open arcades, usually with sloping wooden roofs. This form of the cloister was generally superseded in England by a range of windows, usually unglazed but sometimes, as at Gloucester, provided with glass, lighting a vaulted ambulatory. In southern climates, the open-arcaded cloister remained standard; of this type are the cloisters of Saint-Trophîme at Arles in southern France, Santo Domingo de Silos in Spain, and the Belém Monastery near Lisbon, all of which are famous for their sculptural decoration.

      The open cloister attained its fullest development in Italy, however. A fine example, damaged beyond full repair during World War II, was the Campo Santo at Pisa, consisting of four ambulatories as wide and lofty as the nave of a church, with inner walls covered with early Renaissance frescoes. An especially fine example of the Renaissance cloister is provided by Donato Bramante's design for the two-story open arcade at Santa Maria della Pace in Rome.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

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  • Cloister — • The English equivalent of the Latin word clausura (from claudere, to shut up ) Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Cloister     Cloister      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Cloister — Clois ter, n. [OF. cloistre, F. clo[^i]tre, L. claustrum, pl. claustra, bar, bolt, bounds, fr. claudere, clausum, to close. See {Close}, v. t., and cf. {Claustral}.] [1913 Webster] 1. An inclosed place. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. A covered …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cloister — [klois′tər] n. [ME < OFr cloistre & OE clauster, both < ML(Ec) claustrum, portion of monastery closed off to the laity < L, a bolt, place shut in < pp. of claudere, to CLOSE2] 1. a place of religious seclusion: monastery or convent 2 …   English World dictionary

  • cloister — n 1 Cloister, convent, monastery, nunnery, abbey, priory. Cloister and convent are general terms denoting a place of retirement from the world for members of a religious community; they may apply to houses for recluses of either sex. In such use… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Cloister — Clois ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cloistered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cloistering}.] To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from the world; to immure. [1913 Webster] None among them are thought worthy to be styled religious persons but those… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cloister — ► NOUN 1) a covered, and typically colonnaded, passage round an open court in a convent, monastery, college, or cathedral. 2) (the cloister) the secluded life of a monk or nun. ► VERB ▪ seclude or shut up in a convent or monastery. DERIVATIVES… …   English terms dictionary

  • cloister — index circumscribe (surround by boundary), envelop, restrict, sequester (seclude), shut Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • cloister — [n] secluded religious place abbey, cell, chapter house, convent, friary, hermitage, house, lamasery, monastery, nunnery, order, priorate, priory, religious community, retreat, sanctuary; concepts 368,516 …   New thesaurus

  • Cloister — Cloisters redirects here. For the museum in New York City, see The Cloisters. For other uses, see Cloister (disambiguation). Cloister at Salisbury Cathedral …   Wikipedia

  • cloister — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. abbey, priory, convent, hermitage, monastery; retreat, sanctuary; arcade, colonnade. See seclusion, abode, temple. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [A place of religious seclusion] Syn. monastery, convent, abbey …   English dictionary for students

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