chantry

/chan"tree, chahn"-/, n., pl. chantries. Eccles.
1. an endowment for the singing or saying of Mass for the souls of the founders or of persons named by them.
2. a chapel or the like so endowed.
3. the priests of a chantry endowment.
4. a chapel attached to a church, used for minor services.
[1300-50; ME chanterie < MF. See CHANT, -ERY]

* * *

      chapel, generally within a church, endowed for the singing of masses for the founder after his death. The practice of founding chantries, or chantry chapels, in western Europe began during the 13th century. A chantry was added to the cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris in 1258. During the 14th century, the chantry movement so established itself as a manifestation of religious life that these chapels became a part of the original plan of cathedrals, as at Tours and Bordeaux. The earliest recorded chantry in England is that of Bishop Hugh of Wells in Lincoln cathedral, c. 1235. When the number of foundations rapidly increased after the plague known as the Black Death in 1349, chantries were established not only in churches but in monasteries, hospitals, and grammar schools in memory of the founders. During the English Reformation the chantries were largely abolished.

      Such chapels are almost invariably screened; sometimes they are merely enclosures surrounded by oak screens, but more often they are handsome stone-traceried structures, with heraldry and carving; and in many instances there is an effigy of the founder on a stone tomb chest. Among well-known chantries are the Chapel of Henry VII in Westminster Abbey, Bishop Alcock's Chapel in Ely cathedral, and the Beauchamp Chapel in St. Mary's, Warwick.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Chantry — • The endowment of one or more priests to say or sing Mass for the soul of the endower, or for the souls of persons named by him, and also, in the greater number of cases, to perform certain other offices, such as those of choir member in a… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Chantry — Chant ry, n.; pl. {Chantries}. [OF. chanterie, fr. chanter to sing.] 1. An endowment or foundation for the chanting of masses and offering of prayers, commonly for the founder. [1913 Webster] 2. A chapel or altar so endowed. Cowell. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Chantry — Nom porté en Belgique et dans le département du Nord. C est certainement une variante de Chanterie, rencontré dans le même secteur géographique, surnom donné à un chantre (ancien français chanterie = chant d église) …   Noms de famille

  • chantry — [chan′trē, chän′trē] n. pl. chantries [ME chanterie < OFr: see CHANT] R.C.Ch. 1. an endowment to pay for Masses and prayers for the soul of a specified person, often the endower: an earlier term 2. a chapel or altar endowed, esp. in the Middle …   English World dictionary

  • Chantry — For other uses, see Chantry (disambiguation). Chantry is the English term for a fund established to pay for a priest to celebrate sung Masses for a specified purpose, generally for the soul of the deceased donor. Chantries were endowed with lands …   Wikipedia

  • Chantry —    A small chapel attached to a Parish Church where the daily offices are said, e. g., the chantry of Grace Church, New York. Anciently the chantry was an endowed chapel …   American Church Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • chantry — noun (plural chantries) Etymology: Middle English chanterie, from Anglo French, literally, singing, from chanter Date: 14th century 1. an endowment for the chanting of masses commonly for the founder 2. a chapel endowed by a chantry …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • chantry — chan|try [ˈtʃa:ntri US ˈtʃæn ] n also chantry .chapel plural chantries [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: chanterie singing , from chanter; CHANT1] a small church or part of a church paid for by someone so that priests can pray for them… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • chantry — also chantry cha.pel noun (C) a small church or part of a church paid for by someone so that priests can pray for them there after they die …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • chantry — /ˈtʃæntri/ (say chantree), /ˈtʃantri/ (say chahntree) noun (plural chantries) Ecclesiastical 1. an endowment for the singing or saying of mass for the souls of the founders or of persons named by them. 2. a chapel or the like so endowed. 3. the… …   Australian English dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.