carrier

/kar"ee euhr/, n.
1. a person or thing that carries.
2. an employee of the post office who carries mail.
3. a person who delivers newspapers, magazines, etc., on a particular route.
4. Transp.
a. an individual or company, as a railroad or steamship line, engaged in transporting passengers or goods for profit.
5. Insurance. a company that acts or functions as an underwriter or insurer.
6. a frame, usually of metal, attached to a vehicle for carrying skis, luggage, etc., as on top of an automobile or station wagon; rack.
8. Immunol. an individual harboring specific pathogenic organisms who, though often immune to the agent harbored, may transmit the disease to others.
9. Genetics.
a. an individual possessing an unexpressed, recessive trait.
b. the bearer of a defective gene.
10. Also called carrier wave. Radio. the wave whose amplitude, frequency, or phase is to be varied or modulated to transmit a signal.
11. Mach. a mechanism by which something is carried or moved.
12. Chem. a catalytic agent that brings about a transfer of an element or group of atoms from one compound to another.
13. Also called charge carrier. Physics. any of the mobile electrons or holes in a metal or semiconductor that enable it to conduct electrical charge.
14. Physical Chem. a usually inactive substance that acts as a vehicle for an active substance.
16. Painting. base1 (def. 15b).
[1350-1400; ME; see CARRY, -ER1]

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people
French  Porteur , also called  Takulli  or  Dakelh 

      Athabaskan-speaking North American Indian tribe centred in the upper branches of the Fraser River between the Coast Mountains and the Rocky Mountains in what is now central British Columbia. The name by which they are most commonly known derives from the custom whereby widows carried the ashes of their deceased husbands in knapsacks for three years. The name Takulli (“People Who Go upon the Water”) is of obscure origin. Although their original territory was significantly inland from the Pacific, traditional Carrier culture shared many of the customs of the Northwest Coast Indians (Northwest Coast Indian).

      The Carrier were semisedentary, moving seasonally between villages and hunting and fishing camps. Southern Carrier people lived in semisubterranean houses; northern Carrier people made gabled houses of poles and planks, much like those of their coastal neighbours. Both types of dwellings were communal.

      Carrier social organization was also much like that of the coastal tribes, though without the slavery commonly practiced among those neighbours. It included elaborate class structures composed of nobles and commoners, usually with complex obligations to marry outside one's lineage, clan, and house. Each subgroup had exclusive rights to its territory, and encroachments by other subgroups constituted grounds for reprisal or compensation. The Carrier practiced the potlatch, the custom of large gift-giving feasts or ceremonies for the recognition of such significant events as marriage.

      Carrier economics relied chiefly on the plentiful river salmon, which the people supplemented by hunting various kinds of local game and collecting wild plant foods. They exploited resources from the abundant woodlands and had a woodworking tradition that created highly decorated utilitarian items such as canoes, weapons, and cooking vessels. Carrier craftsmen carved pillars, commonly referred to as totem poles (totem pole), depicting the crests of noble-status individuals and lineages, as well as spirit-beings from religion, myth, and legend. Carrier religious beliefs centred on a great sky god and many spirits in nature which were contacted through dreams, visions, ritual, and magic. They also believed in both reincarnation and an afterlife.

      Early 21st-century population estimates indicated more than 1,000 Carrier descendants.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • CARRIER (J.-B.) — CARRIER JEAN BAPTISTE (1756 1794) Le plus fameux de ceux que Michelet a appelés «les missionnaires de la Terreur». Fils d’un cultivateur aisé du Cantal, procureur à la veille de la Révolution, Carrier est élu par son département d’origine à la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • carrier — CARRIER. s. m. Ouvrier, homme de journée qui travaille à tirer la pierre des carrières; ou l Entrepreneur qui fait ouvrir une carrière pour en tirer de la pierre. Maître Carrier. Manoeuvre Carrier …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

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  • carrier — late 14c., agent noun from CARRY (Cf. carry). Meaning person or animal that carries and disseminates infection without suffering obvious disease is from 1899; genetic sense is 1933. As a short form of aircraft carrier it dates from 1917. Carrier… …   Etymology dictionary

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