canoe

canoeist, n.
/keuh nooh"/, n., v., canoed, canoeing.
n.
1. any of various slender, open boats, tapering to a point at both ends, propelled by paddles or sometimes sails and traditionally formed of light framework covered with bark, skins, or canvas, or formed from a dug-out or burned-out log or logs, and now usually made of aluminum, fiberglass, etc.
2. any of various small, primitive light boats.
3. paddle one's own canoe, Informal.
a. to handle one's own affairs; manage independently.
b. to mind one's own business.
v.i.
4. to paddle a canoe.
5. to go in a canoe.
v.t.
6. to transport or carry by canoe.
[1545-55; < F < Sp canoa < Arawak; r. canoa < Sp]

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Lightweight boat pointed at both ends and propelled by one or more paddles.

The earliest canoes had light frames of wood covered by tightly stretched tree bark. The birchbark canoe was first used by the Algonquian Indians in what is now the northeastern U.S. and Canada, and its use passed westward. Canoes were often about 20 ft (6 m) in length, though war canoes might be as long as 100 ft (30 m). The dugout canoe, made from a hollowed-out log, was used by Indians in what is now the southeastern U.S. and along the Pacific coast as far north as Canada, as well as by peoples in Africa and New Zealand. Modern canoes are made of wood, canvas over wood frames, aluminum, and molded plastic or fibreglass. Most are open from end to end, but the kayak is also considered a canoe. See also canoeing.

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boat
 lightweight boat pointed at both ends and propelled by one or more paddles (not oars). Paddlers face the bow.

      There are two main forms of the canoe. The modern recreational or sport Canadian canoe is open from end to end; it is propelled with a paddle having a single blade. The kayak has a covered deck with a well, or cockpit, into which the paddler snugly fits; it is propelled with a double-bladed paddle. Other boats sometimes called canoes include the dugout (a shaped and hollowed-out log), or pirogue.

  Columbus recorded the word canoa as that used by West Indians to describe their pirogue-like boats. The earliest canoes had light frames of wood or, for the Eskimo kayak, whalebone covered by tightly stretched bark of trees (usually birch, occasionally elm) or animal skins (the kayak). Others were made from pieces of bark sewed together with roots and caulked with resin; sheathing and ribs were pressed into the sheet of bark, which was hung from a gunwale temporarily supported by stakes. The birchbark canoe was first used by the Algonquin Indians in what is now the northeastern part of the United States and adjacent Canada, and its use passed westward. Such canoes were used for carrying goods, hunters, fishermen, and warriors. The craft varied in length from about 4 1/2 m (15 feet)—6 m (20 feet) being most common—to about 30 m (100 feet) in length for some war canoes; sometimes as many as 20 paddlers were employed. The dugout was used by Indians in what is now the southeastern United States and along the Pacific coast as far north as modern Canada, as well as by peoples in Africa, New Zealand, and elsewhere in the Pacific. For use in the open sea, canoes were fitted with outriggers, or pairs of canoes were linked by spars ( catamaran). The early French missionaries and explorers in northern North America used birchbark canoes, as did the voyageurs and others later engaged in the fur trade, which required relatively large canoes.

 Modern sport and recreation canoes are of varying size but are usually about 4.5–6 m (15–20 feet) in length and about 85 cm (33 in.) in breadth. Depth is about 30 to 36 cm (12 to 14 in.), with the ends rising slightly higher. Canoes are made of wood, canvas over wood frames, aluminum, molded plastic, fibreglass, or synthetic fibre composites. The optimum material for canoe construction varies by the intended usage of the craft. Fibre composite canoes constructed of materials such as Kevlar offer excellent durability with minimal weight, making them well suited for canoe camping that requires numerous portages. Aluminum and molded plastic canoes are highly impact resistant and are used primarily on rivers where possible collisions with rocks and other submerged objects might damage a fibreglass canoe. Some canoes are designed or adapted to be propelled by a sail, and some aluminum and molded plastic canoes are made with square sterns to accommodate outboard motors. The introduction of the faltboat (German: Faltboot, “folding boat”) early in the 20th century greatly extended the use of the kayak for canoeists who did not live near water but who could easily transport the folded craft to water.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • canoe — ca*noe (k[.a]*n[=oo] ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Canoed} (k[.a]*n[=oo]d ) p. pr. & vb. n. {Canoeing} (k[.a]*n[=oo] [i^]ng).] To manage a canoe, or voyage in a canoe. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • canoe — ☆ canoe [kə no͞o′] n. [earlier canoa < Sp (used by Columbus in 1493) < Carib] a narrow, light boat with its sides meeting in a sharp edge at each end: it is moved by one or more paddles vi. canoed, canoeing to paddle, or go in, a canoe vt.… …   English World dictionary

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  • canoe — 1550s, from Sp. canoa, term used by Columbus, from Arawakan (Haiti) canaoua. Extended to rough made or dugout boats generally. Early variants in English included cano, canow, canoa, etc., before spelling settled down c.1600. As a verb, attested… …   Etymology dictionary

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