blockade

blockader, n.
/blo kayd"/, n., v., blockaded, blockading.
n.
1. the isolating, closing off, or surrounding of a place, as a port, harbor, or city, by hostile ships or troops to prevent entrance or exit.
2. any obstruction of passage or progress: We had difficulty in getting through the blockade of bodyguards.
3. Pathol. interruption or inhibition of a normal physiological signal, as a nerve impulse or a heart muscle-contraction impulse.
v.t.
4. to subject to a blockade.
[1670-80; BLOCK (V.) + -ADE1]
Syn. 1. See siege.

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Act of war whereby one party blocks entry to or departure from an enemy area, often a coast.

Blockades are regulated by international law and custom, which require advance warning to neutral states and impartial application. Penalties for breach of blockade are seizure of ship and cargo and their possible condemnation as lawful prizes. Neutral ships may not be destroyed for blockade running.

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      an act of war by which a belligerent prevents access to or departure from a defined part of the enemy's coasts.

      Blockades are regulated by international customary law and by international treaty law. A blockade must be declared in advance by notification of all neutral powers, and it must be applied impartially against ships of all states. Mere declarations of a blockade or “paper blockades,” common in the 18th and early 19th centuries, have no legal effect; the blockading state must make the blockade effective by maintaining naval or air forces in the area in sufficient strength to prevent ingress or egress from the enemy's ports. Once the blockade ceases to be effectively maintained, the legal state of blockade lapses and can only be reestablished by due notification and enforcement.

      Penalties for breach of blockade are seizure of ship and cargo and their possible condemnation as lawful prize. Neutral ships may not be destroyed for blockade running.

      The law of blockade, in common with other laws of war, has evolved historically to meet the needs of major powers. The development of submarines and aircraft, in particular, made it impossible to station blockading warships in constant positions off an enemy's coasts to maintain close blockades, and it has subsequently been accepted that long-range blockades (maintained by naval forces out of sight of the enemy's coast) are legal if they effectively prevent ingress and egress.

      There is little legal authority, however, by which the meaning of “effective blockade” may be precisely defined under conditions of modern naval warfare. There is authority for the view that risk of seizure for ships running the blockade must be substantial, entailing the presence of patrolling ships.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
(as ports, so as to prevent egress or ingress), , , , (as of a port), ,


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