basil

/baz"euhl, bas"-, bay"zeuhl, -seuhl/, n.
any of several aromatic herbs belonging to the genus Ocimum, of the mint family, as O. basilicum (sweet basil), having purplish-green ovate leaves used in cooking.
[1400-50; late ME basile < MF < LL basilicum < Gk basilikón, neut. of basilikós royal. See BASILIC]

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I
Herb consisting of the dried leaves of Ocimum basilicum, an annual herb of the mint family, native to India and Iran.

The dried large-leaf varieties have a fragrant aroma faintly reminiscent of anise, with a warm, sweet, aromatic, mildly pungent flavour. The dried leaves of common basil are less fragrant and more pungent. Basil is widely grown as a kitchen herb. Tea made from basil leaves is a stimulant. The heart-shaped basil leaf is a symbol of love in Italy.
II
(as used in expressions)
Basil Bulgaroctonus
Basil the Macedonian
Basil the Great Saint
Liddell Hart Sir Basil Henry
Rathbone Philip St. John Basil

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▪ prince of Moldavia
byname  Basil the Wolf , Romanian  Vasile Lupu 
born c. 1595
died 1661, Constantinople

      ambitious and enterprising prince of Moldavia (1634–53) who introduced the first written laws and printing press to his principality.

      Albanian in origin, Basil acceded to the throne of Moldavia in the spring of 1634. He intrigued throughout his reign to acquire the Walachian (Walachia) throne as well, and in 1637 and 1639 led unsuccessful expeditions against the ruling prince of Walachia, Matthew Basarab (Basarab, Matthew). Basil's military expenses and payments to his Turkish overlords taxed his subjects; but his rule also brought important cultural improvements through the creation of Greek monastic schools, the first codification of Moldavian civil and criminal law (1646), and the establishment of the first printing press in the country at Iaşi. In 1653 he was briefly evicted from his throne by Matthew Basarab and the Prince of Transylvania, but regained his crown with the help of the cossacks of Bohdan Chmielnicki, hetman of the Ukraine and also his son-in-law. He subsequently pressed into Walachia, but was decisively beaten at Vinta (July 1653). Deposed by his own boyars, he fled to the Khan of the Tatars, and thence to Constantinople, where he died in prison. His reign was one of the longest in the history of Moldavia.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Basil — ist ein männlicher Vorname[1] und ein Familienname. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Herkunft und Bedeutung 2 Bekannte Namensträger 2.1 Vorname 2.2 Familien …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Basil — Bas il, n. [F. basilic, fr. L. basilicus royal, Gr. basiliko s fr. basiley s king.] (Bot.) The name given to several aromatic herbs of the Mint family, but chiefly to the common or sweet basil ({Ocymum basilicum}), and the bush basil, or lesser… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • basil — aromatic shrubby plant, early 15c., from O.Fr. basile (15c., Mod.Fr. basilic), from M.L. basilicum, from Gk. basilikon (phyton) royal (plant), from basileus king (see BASIL (Cf. Basil)). So called, probably, because it was believed to have been… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Basil — m English: from the Greek name Basileios ‘royal’ (a derivative of basileus king). This name was borne by St Basil the Great (c.330–379), bishop of Caesarea, a theologian regarded as one of the Fathers of the Eastern Church. It was also the name… …   First names dictionary

  • Basil — Basil,   Otto, österreichischer Schriftsteller, * Wien 24. 12. 1901, ✝ ebenda 19. 2. 1983; schrieb Gedichte, Essays, Theaterkritiken (Sammlung »Lob und Tadel«, 1981); übersetzte aus dem Französischen; gab 1938 und 1945 48 die Zeitschrift »Plan«… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • basil — [bā′zəl, baz′əl] n. [ME & OFr basile < ML basilicum < Gr basilikon ( phyton), basil, lit., royal (plant) < basileus, king] any of a genus (Ocimum) of fragrant plants of the mint family, esp. a white flowered garden herb ( O. basilicum)… …   English World dictionary

  • Basil — Bas il (b[a^]z [i^]l), n. [Corrupt. from E. basan, F. basane, LL. basanium, bazana, fr. Ar. bith[=a]na, prop., lining.] The skin of a sheep tanned with bark. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Basil — Bas il (b[a^]z [i^]l), n. [Cf. F. basile and E. {Bezel}.] The slope or angle to which the cutting edge of a tool, as a plane, is ground. Grier. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Basil — Bas il, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Basiled} (?); p. pr. & vb. n. {Basiling}.] To grind or form the edge of to an angle. Moxon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Basil — Basil, so v.w. Basilios …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Basil — masc. proper name, from L. Basilius, from Gk. Basileios kingly, royal, from basileus king, of unknown origin, possibly from a language of Asia Minor (Cf. Lydian battos king ) …   Etymology dictionary

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