arrest

arrestable, adj.arrestment, n.
/euh rest"/, v.t.
1. to seize (a person) by legal authority or warrant; take into custody: The police arrested the burglar.
2. to catch and hold; attract and fix; engage: The loud noise arrested our attention.
3. to check the course of; stop; slow down: to arrest progress.
4. Med. to control or stop the active progress of (a disease): The new drug did not arrest the cancer.
n.
5. the taking of a person into legal custody, as by officers of the law.
6. any seizure or taking by force.
7. an act of stopping or the state of being stopped: the arrest of tooth decay.
8. Mach. any device for stopping machinery; stop.
9. under arrest, in custody of the police or other legal authorities: They placed the suspect under arrest at the scene of the crime.
[1275-1325; (v.) ME aresten < AF, MF arester, < VL *arrestare to stop (see AR-, REST2); (n.) ME arest(e) < AF, OF, n. deriv. of v.]
Syn. 1. apprehend. 2. secure, rivet, occupy. 3. stay. See stop. 5. detention, apprehension, imprisonment. 7. stoppage, halt, stay, check.

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Restraint and seizure of a person by someone (e.g., a police officer) acting under legal authority.

An officer may arrest a person who is committing or attempting to commit a crime in the officer's presence. Arrest is also permitted if the officer reasonably believes that a crime has been committed and that the person arrested is the guilty party. A court or judicial officer may issue an arrest warrant on a showing of probable cause. Most states restrict or prohibit arrest in civil (noncriminal) cases; an example of occasionally permitted civil arrest is the taking into custody of a debtor who might otherwise abscond. In the U.S., suspects must be warned of their rights when they are arrested (see Miranda v. Arizona). An unlawful arrest is regarded as false imprisonment and usually invalidates any evidence collected in connection with it. See also rights of the accused; grand jury; indictment.

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law
 placing of a person in custody or under restraint, usually for the purpose of compelling obedience to the law. If the arrest occurs in the course of criminal procedure, the purpose of the restraint is to hold the person for answer to a criminal charge or to prevent him from committing an offense. In civil proceedings, the purpose is to hold the person to a demand made against him.

      In both common-law and civil-law jurisdictions, certain prerequisites must be met before there can be any interference with individual liberty. An arrest warrant may be issued by a court or judicial officer on a showing of probable cause that a criminal offense has been committed and that the person charged in the warrant is probably guilty. An arrest warrant may validly be served only by the person or class of persons to whom the warrant is addressed. In many states of the United States this can be a private citizen as well as a police officer.

      More numerous and of greater practical importance are arrests without warrants. A police officer may arrest a person who is committing or attempting to commit a crime in the officer's presence. An officer may also arrest a person provided that the officer reasonably believes a crime to have been committed and the person arrested to be the guilty party. In the United States an indictment provides sufficient warrant for arrest of the accused, because the return of an indictment by a grand jury constitutes a finding of “probable cause.” Arrests may also be made of persons on probation or parole who have violated the conditions of their release, even though such violations do not involve commission of criminal acts. In many cases of minor offenses, the accused is not arrested but is notified of pending criminal proceedings by a summons.

      Unlawful or invalid arrests may have a variety of important legal consequences. For instance, it is generally recognized that a search of the person arrested and of the immediate premises is valid when “incident” to a lawful arrest. But if the arrest is unlawful, the search is also invalid, and can be barred from the criminal proceedings. In some situations illegal arrest practices may even render a confession of the defendant inadmissible at the trial. In the United States, Supreme Court decisions in Escobedo v. Illinois (1964) and Miranda (Miranda v. Arizona) v. Arizona (1966) called for the exclusion of many types of evidence if the arresting officers failed to advise the suspect of his constitutional right not to answer any questions and to have an attorney present during such questioning. (See Miranda v. Arizona.)

      Arrest in civil cases is today regarded as a drastic remedy, and in most jurisdictions it is available only in situations specified by statute, such as the arrest of a debtor who may otherwise abscond. Arrest may also be authorized in connection with other specialized civil proceedings. The most prevalent instances of such arrests are of persons whose extreme mental disorders constitute a recognizable danger to themselves or to others.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • arrest — ar·rest 1 /ə rest/ n [Middle French arest, from arester to stop, seize, arrest, ultimately from Latin ad to, at + restare to stay]: the restraining and seizure of a person whether or not by physical force by someone acting under authority (as a… …   Law dictionary

  • arrest — Arrest. s. m. Jugement d une Cour, d une Justice superieure, par lequel une question de fait ou de droit est arrestée. Arrest du Conseil. arrest du Parlement. arrest interlocutoire. arrest par deffaut. arrest definitif. arrest contradictoire.… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • arrest — Arrest, m. C est ores le jugement d une Cour souveraine, Supremae curiae consultum iudicatum. En laquelle signification aucuns veulent dire qu il le faut escrire par simple r, comme venant de {{t=g}}aréston{{/t}} placitum curiae, toutefois les… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • arrest — vb 1 Arrest, check, interrupt mean to stop in mid course. Arrest implies a holding fixed in the midst of movement, development, or progress and usually a prevention of further advance until someone or something effects a release {arrest the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Arrest — Ar*rest , n. [OE. arest, arrest, OF. arest, F. arr[^e]t, fr. arester. See {Arrest}, v. t., {Arr?t}.] 1. The act of stopping, or restraining from further motion, etc.; stoppage; hindrance; restraint; as, an arrest of development. [1913 Webster] As …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arrest — Ar*rest , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arrested}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Arresting}.] [OE. aresten, OF. arester, F. arr[^e]ter, fr. LL. arrestare; L. ad + restare to remain, stop; re + stare to stand. See {Rest} remainder.] 1. To stop; to check or hinder the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arrest — steht für: Arrest (JVA), eine Disziplinarmaßnahme in einer Justizvollzugsanstalt Arrest (Zivilprozess), eine Maßnahme zur Sicherung der Zwangsvollstreckung Hausarrest, das Gebot, ein Haus oder eine Wohnung nicht zu verlassen Jugendarrest, ein… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Arrest — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Arrest C …   Wikipedia Español

  • Arrest — Sm std. (15. Jh.) Entlehnung. Vermutlich über das Niederländische entlehnt aus afrz. arrest Beschlagnahme, Festhalten, (später) Haftbefehl, Verhaftung , das eine postverbale Bildung zu afrz. arrester ist (entsprechend früher im Deutschen bezeugt …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • arrest — [n1] taking into custody accommodation, apprehension, appropriation, bag*, booby trap*, bust, captivity, capture, collar, commitment, confinement, constraint, crimp*, detention, drop*, fall*, gaff*, glom*, grab*, heat*, hook*, imprisonment,… …   New thesaurus

  • arrèst — m. arrêt ; station ; jugement ; terme. Metre un arrèst ais iniquitats. Chin d arrèst : chien d arrêt …   Diccionari Personau e Evolutiu

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