argillite

argillitic /ahr'jeuh lit"ik/, adj.
/ahr"jeuh luyt'/, n.
any compact sedimentary rock composed mainly of clay materials; clay stone.
[1785-95; < L argill(a) ARGIL + -ITE1]

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Argillite — may also refer to Argillite, Kentucky. An argillite (pronEng|ˈɑrdʒɨlaɪt) is a fine grained sedimentary rock composed predominantly of indurated clay particles. Argillites are basically lithified muds and oozes. They contain variable amounts of… …   Wikipedia

  • Argillite — Ar gil*lite, n. [Gr. ? clay + lite.] (Min.) Argillaceous schist or slate; clay slate. Its colors is bluish or blackish gray, sometimes greenish gray, brownish red, etc. {Ar gil*lit ic}, a. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • argillite — [är′jə līt΄] n. [L argilla (see ARGILLACEOUS) + ITE1] a hardened mudstone showing no slatelike cleavage …   English World dictionary

  • argillite — argilitas statusas T sritis chemija apibrėžtis Molių grupės nuosėdinė uoliena, susidedanti iš hidrožėručių, montmorilonito ir chlorito grupių mineralų. atitikmenys: angl. argillite rus. аргиллит …   Chemijos terminų aiškinamasis žodynas

  • argillite — noun Date: 1795 a compact argillaceous rock cemented by silica and having no slaty cleavage …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • argillite — noun A fine grained sedimentary rock, intermediate between shale and slate, sometimes used as a building material …   Wiktionary

  • argillite — n. any rock made up of layers of clay sediment …   English contemporary dictionary

  • argillite — [ α:dʒɪlʌɪt] noun Geology a sedimentary rock formed from consolidated clay. Origin C18: from L. argilla clay + ite1 …   English new terms dictionary

  • argillite — ar·gil·lite …   English syllables

  • argillite — ar•gil•lite [[t]ˈɑr dʒəˌlaɪt[/t]] n. gel pet any compact sedimentary rock composed mainly of clay materials; clay stone • Etymology: 1785–95; < L argill(a) clay (< Gk árgillos, der. of argós white) + ite I ar gil•lit′ic ˈlɪt ɪk adj …   From formal English to slang

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