announce


announce
announceable, adj.
/euh nowns"/, v., announced, announcing.
v.t.
1. to make known publicly or officially; proclaim; give notice of: to announce a special sale.
2. to state the approach or presence of: to announce guests; to announce dinner.
3. to make known to the mind or senses.
4. to serve as an announcer of: The mayor announced the program.
5. to state; declare.
6. to state in advance; declare beforehand.
7. to write, or have printed, and send a formal declaration of an event, esp. a social event, as a wedding.
v.i.
8. to be employed or serve as an announcer, esp. of a radio or television broadcast: She announces for the local radio station.
9. to declare one's candidacy, as for a political office (usually fol. by for): We are hoping that he will announce for governor.
[1490-1500; < MF anoncer < L annuntiare, equiv. to an- AN-2 + nuntiare to announce, deriv. of nuntius messenger]
Syn. 1. declare, report, promulgate. ANNOUNCE, PROCLAIM, PUBLISH mean to communicate something in a formal or public way. TO ANNOUNCE is to give out news, often of something expected in the future: to announce a lecture series. TO PROCLAIM is to make a widespread and general announcement of something of public interest: to proclaim a holiday. TO PUBLISH is to make public in an official way, now esp. by printing: to publish a book.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Announce — An*nounce , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Announced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Announcing}.] [OF. anoncier, F. annoncer, fr. L. annuntiare; ad + nuntiare to report, relate, nuntius messenger, bearer of news. See {Nuncio}, and cf. {Annunciate}.] [1913 Webster] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • announce — (v.) c.1500, proclaim, make known, from O.Fr. anoncier announce, proclaim (12c., Mod.Fr. annoncer), from L. annuntiare, adnuntiare to announce, relate, lit. to bring news, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + nuntiare relate, report, from …   Etymology dictionary

  • announce — [v1] make a proclamation advertise, annunciate, blast, blazon, broadcast, call, communicate, declare, disclose, disseminate, divulge, drum*, give out, impart, intimate, issue, make known, make public, pass the word*, proclaim, promulgate,… …   New thesaurus

  • announce — ► VERB 1) make a public declaration about. 2) be a sign of: lilies announce the arrival of summer. DERIVATIVES announcer noun. ORIGIN Latin annuntiare, from nuntius messenger …   English terms dictionary

  • announce — I verb acquaint, advertise, advise, affirm, allege, annunciate, apprise, assert, asservate, aver, broadcast, bruit, bulletin, circulate, communicate, contend, convey, declare, disabuse, disclose, disseminate, enunciate, foretell, give out, herald …   Law dictionary

  • announce — publish, proclaim, *declare, promulgate, advertise, broadcast Analogous words: disclose, *reveal, divulge, tells *communicate, impart Contrasted words: *suppress, repress: conceal, *hide, bury: withhold, hold, hold back, reserve (see …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • announce — [ə nouns′] vt. announced, announcing [ME announcen < OFr anoncier < L annuntiare, to make known < ad , to + nuntiare, to report < nuntius, messenger: see NUNCIO] 1. to declare publicly; give notice of formally; proclaim 2. to say or… …   English World dictionary

  • announce — verb ADVERB ▪ formally, officially, publicly ▪ happily, proudly, triumphantly ▪ The company proudly announced the launch of its new range of cars. ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • announce */*/*/ — UK [əˈnaʊns] / US verb [transitive] Word forms announce : present tense I/you/we/they announce he/she/it announces present participle announcing past tense announced past participle announced 1) to make a public or official statement, especially… …   English dictionary

  • announce — an|nounce W1S2 [əˈnauns] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: annoncer, from Latin annuntiare, from ad to + nuntiare to report ] 1.) to officially tell people about something, especially about a plan or a decision ▪ They announced their… …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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