Great Fire of London

Fire of London.

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(September 2–5, 1666) Worst fire in London's history.

It destroyed a large part of the city, including most of the civic buildings, St. Paul's Cathedral, 87 parish churches, and about 13,000 houses. It began accidentally at the house of the king's baker in Pudding Lane near London Bridge, and a violent east wind encouraged the flames. On the fourth day houses were blown up by gunpowder to master the fire. The Thames River swarmed with vessels filled with people trying to save their goods, and some fled to the hills of Hampstead and Highgate, but most of the houseless Londoners settled in Moorfields.

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▪ English history
 (September 2–5, 1666), the worst fire in London's history. It destroyed a large part of the City of London, including most of the civic buildings, old St. Paul's Cathedral (Saint Paul's Cathedral), 87 parish churches, and about 13,000 houses.

      On Sunday, September 2, 1666, the fire began accidentally in the house of the king's baker in Pudding Lane near London Bridge. A violent east wind encouraged the flames, which raged during the whole of Monday and part of Tuesday. On Wednesday the fire slackened; on Thursday it was extinguished, but on the evening of that day the flames again burst forth at The Temple (Temple, The). Some houses were at once blown up by gunpowder, and thus the fire was finally mastered. Many interesting details of the fire are given in Samuel Pepys (Pepys, Samuel)'s Diary. The river swarmed with vessels filled with persons carrying away as many of their goods as they were able to save. Some fled to the hills of Hampstead and Highgate, but Moorfields was the chief refuge of the houseless Londoners.

      Within a few days of the fire, three different plans were presented to the king for the rebuilding of the city, by Christopher Wren (Wren, Sir Christopher), John Evelyn (Evelyn, John), and Robert Hooke (Hooke, Robert); but none of these plans to regularize the streets was adopted, and in consequence the old lines were in almost every case retained. Nevertheless, Wren's great work was the erection of St. Paul's Cathedral and the many churches ranged around it as satellites. Hooke's task was the humbler one of arranging as city surveyor for the building of the houses.

      The Great Fire is commemorated by The Monument (Monument, The), a column erected in the 1670s near the source of the blaze.

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Universalium. 2010.

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