Colemanballs

n [pl] (BrE)
the funny or ridiculous things that people, especially sports commentators such as David Coleman, sometimes say by mistake when they are speaking fast and excitedly. The word was invented by the magazine Private Eye as the title of a regular list it included of the funniest examples.

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Universalium. 2010.

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