Teutoburg Forest

Teutoburg Forest [toi΄tō̂ boor΄gər vält′to͞ot′ə bʉrg΄, tyo͞ot′ə bʉrg΄]
region of low, forested mountains, mostly in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany: highest point, c. 1,500 ft (457 m): Ger. name Teutoburger Wald [toi΄tō̂ boor΄gər vält′]

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Range of forested hills, northern Germany.

It was the scene of a battle in AD 9 in which German tribes defeated the Roman legions, thus establishing the Rhine River as the German-Latin border. The Hermannsdenkmal, a colossal statue commemorating the battle, stands outside Detmold. There are numerous health and holiday resorts in the forest's small hill towns.

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      westernmost escarpment of the Weser Hills (Weserbergland) in northeastern North Rhine-Westphalia (North Rhine–Westphalia) Land (state), northern Germany. Its wooded limestone and sandstone ridges curve from the Ems River valley southeastward in an arc approximately 60 miles (100 km) long and 4 to 6 miles (6.5 to 9.5 km) wide around the north and northeast sides of the Münsterland basin. The highest point in the Teutoburg Forest, the Velmerstot, rises to an elevation of 1,535 feet (468 m) at the southeastern end where the range meets the Egge Mountains. The city of Bielefeld, a diversified industrial centre most famous for its linen textiles, is situated at an important pass through the hills. The Hermannsdenkmal, a colossal metal statue built in the 19th century to commemorate the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (fought AD 9), in which Germanic tribes led by Arminius (German: Hermann) annihilated three Roman legions, stands outside Detmold on the northeastern slope. Numerous health and holiday resorts are established in the small hill towns situated among beech and spruce forests.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Teutoburg Forest — [toi΄tō̂ boor΄gər vält′to͞ot′ə bʉrg΄, tyo͞ot′ə bʉrg΄] region of low, forested mountains, mostly in North Rhine Westphalia, Germany: highest point, c. 1,500 ft (457 m): Ger. name Teutoburger Wald [toi΄tō̂ boor΄gər vält′] …   English World dictionary

  • Teutoburg Forest — View over the Teutoburg Forest The Teutoburg Forest (German: Teutoburger Wald) is a range of low, forested mountains in the German states of Lower Saxony and North Rhine Westphalia which used to be believed to be the scene of …   Wikipedia

  • Teutoburg Forest — or German Teutoburger Wald geographical name range of forested hills W Germany in region between Ems & Weser rivers; highest point 1530 feet (466 meters) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Teutoburg Forest — Teu′to•burg For′est [[t]ˈtu təˌbɜrg, ˈtyu [/t]] n. geg anh a chain of wooded hills in NW Germany, in Westphalia, taken to be the site of a Roman defeat by Germanic tribes a.d. 9. German, Teu•to•bur•ger Wald [[t]ˈtɔɪ toʊˌbɜr gər ˈvɑlt, ˌbʊər [/t]] …   From formal English to slang

  • Teutoburg Forest, Battle of the — ▪ Roman history       (AD 9), battle fought in late summer in which three Roman legions and auxiliary troops under Publius Quinctilius Varus were ambushed and annihilated east of the Rhine by German tribes led by Arminius, a chief of the Cherusci …   Universalium

  • Battle of the Teutoburg Forest — Part of the Roman Germanic wars Cenotaph of Marcus Caelius, 1st …   Wikipedia

  • Teutoburg — may refer to:* The Teutoburg Forest, a range of low, forested mountains in the German states of Lower Saxony and North Rhine Westphalia. * The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest fought there in AD 9 between Germanic tribes and the Roman Empire …   Wikipedia

  • forest — forestal, forestial /feuh res cheuhl/, adj. forested, adj. forestless, adj. forestlike, adj. /fawr ist, for /, n. 1. a large tract of land covered with trees and underbrush; woodland. 2. the trees on such a tract: to cut down a forest …   Universalium

  • Massacre in the Black Forest — Directed by Ferdinando Baldi Rudolf Nussgruber Written by Ferdinando Baldi Adriano Bolzoni Starring Cameron Mitchell Antonella Lualdi Hans von Borsody …   Wikipedia

  • Bavarian Forest — Results of bark beetle in the Bayerischer Wald …   Wikipedia

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