interleukin

interleukin [in΄tər lo͞o′kin]
n.
1. any of a closely related family of polypeptides, derived from many cell types, that stimulate several components of the inflammatory response, including fever; lymphocyte activating factor: in full interleukin-1
2. a glycoprotein lymphocyte product that stimulates the growth of T cells and is used experimentally in cancer therapy; T cell growth factor: in full interleukin-2

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Any of a class of naturally occurring proteins important in regulation of lymphocyte function.

Several known types are recognized as crucial constituents of the body's immune system (see immunity). Antigens and microbes stimulate production of interleukins, which induce production of various types of lymphocytes in a complex series of reactions that ensure a plentiful supply of T cells that fight specific infectious agents.

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      any of a group of naturally occurring proteins that mediate communication between cells. Interleukins regulate cell growth, differentiation, and motility. They are particularly important in stimulating immune responses, such as inflammation.

      Interleukins are a subset of a larger group of cellular messenger molecules called cytokines (cytokine), which are modulators of cellular behaviour. Like other cytokines, interleukins are not stored within cells but are instead secreted rapidly, and briefly, in response to a stimulus, such as an infectious agent. Once an interleukin has been produced, it travels to its target cell and binds to it via a receptor molecule on the cell's surface. This interaction triggers a cascade of signals within the target cell that ultimately alter the cell's behaviour.

      The first interleukins were identified in the 1970s. Initially investigators believed that interleukins were made chiefly by leukocytes (leukocyte) (white blood cells) to act primarily on other leukocytes, and for this reason they named them interleukins, meaning “between leukocytes.” Because leukocytes are involved in mounting immune responses, interleukins were thought to function only as modulators of immune functions. Although this is an important function of interleukins, it is now known that interleukins also are produced by and interact with a host of cells not involved in immunity and are involved in many other physiological functions. Thus the role that interleukins play in the body is much greater than was initially understood.

      Fifteen different types of interleukins are known, and they are designated numerically, IL-1 through IL-15. The immunological functions of most of the interleukins are known to some degree. IL-1 and IL-2 are primarily responsible for activating T and B lymphocytes (B cell) (white blood cells integral to bringing about the acquired immune response), with IL-2 being a stimulant of T- and B-cell growth and maturation. IL-1, along with IL-6, is also a mediator of inflammation. IL-4 often leads to an increase in antibody secretion by B lymphocytes, while IL-12 causes a greater number of the leukocytes cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells to be made. The set of interleukins stimulated by a specific infectious agent determines which cells will respond to the infection and influences some of the clinical manifestations of the disease.

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Universalium. 2010.

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