analytic psychology

n.
the system of psychology developed by C. G. Jung as a variant of psychoanalysis

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Psychoanalytic method of Carl Gustav Jung as he distinguished it from that of Sigmund Freud.

Jung attached less importance than did Freud to the role of childhood sexual conflicts in the development of neurosis. He defined the unconscious to include both the individual's own unconscious and that inherited, partly in the form of archetypes, from his or her ancestors (the "collective unconscious"). He classified people into introvert and extrovert types, and further distinguished them according to four primary functions of the mind
thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition
one or more of which predominated in any given person.

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      the psychoanalytic method of Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung (Jung, Carl) as he distinguished it from that of Sigmund Freud (Freud, Sigmund). Jung attached less importance than did Freud to the role of sexuality in the neuroses and stressed the analysis of patients' immediate conflicts as being more useful in understanding their problems than the uncovering of childhood conflicts. According to Jung's definition, the unconscious includes individuals' personal unconscious and that which they have inherited from their ancestors (the “ collective unconscious”). He classified people into introverted and extraverted types and further distinguished them according to four primary functions of the mind—thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition—one or more of which Jung believed predominates in any given person.

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Universalium. 2010.

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