Zīrid Dynasty

▪ Muslim dynasty
also called  Banū Zīrī 

      Muslim dynasty of Ṣanhājah Berbers whose various branches ruled in Ifrīqīyah (Tunisia and eastern Algeria) and Granada (972–1152). Rising to prominence in the mountains of Kabylie, Algeria, where they established their first capital, Ashīr, the Zīrids became allies of the Fāṭimids of al-Qayrawān. Their loyal support prompted the Fāṭimid caliph al-Muʿizz, when moving to his new capital of Cairo (972), to appoint Yūsuf Buluggīn I ibn Zīrī governor of al-Qayrawān and any other territory the Zīrids might reclaim from their enemies, the Zanātah tribesmen. The Zīrid state under Buluggīn accordingly expanded its boundaries westward as far as Sabtah (now Ceuta, a Spanish exclave in Morocco) on the Strait of Gibraltar; in the reign of Bādīs ibn al-Manṣūr (995–1016) it was divided between the Zīrids at al-Qayrawān in the east and their kinsmen, the Ḥammādids, at Qalʿah (in Algeria). In 1048, encouraged by economic prosperity, the Zīrids under al-Muʿizz (1016–62) declared themselves independent of the Fāṭimids and their Shīʿī doctrine. The Fāṭimids responded (1052) by sending the Banū Hilāl and Banū Sulaym Bedouins into the Maghrib. Cut off from traditional routes to the east, North Africa fell into a state of anarchy—the countryside was devastated, the peasant economy was ruined, and many settled communities reverted to nomadism. The Zīrids, forced to abandon al-Qayrawān, retreated to Mahdīyah, but their shattered state was not long able to survive coastal attacks by Sicilian Normans and finally fell in 1148. In 1067 the Ḥammādids managed to relocate in Bejaïa (Bougie), where they carried on a lively trade until conquered by the Almohads in 1152.

      Another group of Zīrids, who had gone to Spain to serve in the Berber army of the Umayyad al-Muẓaffar (1002–08), established themselves as an independent dynasty (1012–90) in Granada under Zāwī ibn Zīrī. At the beginning of the 11th century the Zīrids were given the province of Ilbīra by the Spanish Umayyad caliph Sulaymān al-Mustaʿīn and by 1038 had extended this kingdom to include Jaén and Cabra. Málaga was taken from the Ḥammūdids c. 1058 by Bādīs ibn Ḥabbūs and became the second centre of Zīrid rule in Spain. Despite their support of the Almohad Yūsuf ibn Tāshufīn at the Battle of Zallāqah in 1086, these Zīrids were overthrown by the Almohads in 1090.

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Universalium. 2010.

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