wage theory

      portion of economic theory that attempts to explain the determination of the payment of labour.

      A brief treatment of wage theory follows. For full treatment, see wage and salary.

      The subsistence theory of wages, advanced by David Ricardo and other classical economists, was based on the population theory of Thomas Malthus. It held that the market price of labour would always tend toward the minimum required for subsistence. If the supply of labour increased, wages (wage and salary) would fall, eventually causing a decrease in the labour supply. If the wage rose above the subsistence level, population would increase until the larger labour force would again force wages down.

      The wage-fund theory held that wages depended on the relative amounts of capital available for the payment of workers and the size of the labour force. Wages increase only with an increase in capital or a decrease in the number of workers. Although the size of the wage fund could change over time, at any given moment it was fixed. Thus, legislation to raise wages would be unsuccessful, since there was only a fixed fund to draw on.

      Karl Marx, an advocate of the labour theory of value, believed that wages were held at the subsistence level by the existence of a large number of unemployed.

      The residual-claimant theory of wages, originated by the American economist Francis A. Walker, held that wages were the remainder of total industrial revenue after rent, interest, and profit (which were independently determined) were deducted.

      In the bargaining theory of wages, there is no single economic principle or force governing wages. Instead, wages and other working conditions are determined by workers, employers, and unions, who determine these conditions by negotiation.

      The marginal productivity theory of wages, formulated in the late 19th century, holds that employers will hire workers of a particular type until the addition to total output made by the last, or marginal, worker to be hired equals the cost of hiring one more worker. The wage rate will equal the value of the marginal product of the last-hired worker.

      Supporters of this theory maintain that the test of an economic theory should be its predictive power. They hold that the marginal-productivity theory is a guide to long-run trends in wage determination and applies more generally than the bargaining theory of wages.

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Universalium. 2010.

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