Vermuyden, Sir Cornelius

▪ Dutch engineer
born 1595, Tholen, Neth.
died April 1683?, London

      British engineer who introduced Dutch land-reclamation methods in England and drained the Fens, the low marshy lands in the east of England.

      An experienced embankment engineer, Vermuyden was employed in 1626 by King Charles I of England to drain Hatfield Chase on the isle of Axholme, Yorkshire. Jointly financed by Dutch and English capitalists, this project was a controversial undertaking, not only for the engineering techniques used but also because it employed Dutch instead of English workmen. The fenmen, local inhabitants who hunted and fished in the fens, attacked the Dutch workers; to complete the project, the engineer had to employ English workers and compensate the fenmen for their loss of hunting and fishing rights.

      In 1630 Vermuyden contracted to drain the Great Fens, or Bedford Level, Cambridgeshire; this project, completed in 1637, drew objections from other engineers, who claimed the drainage system was inadequate. During the English Civil War, Parliament ordered the dikes broken and the land flooded (1642) to stop a Royalist army advance. In 1649 Vermuyden was commissioned to reclaim the Bedford Level; 40,000 acres were drained by 1652.

      In 1653 Vermuyden, who had been knighted in the 1620s and had become a British subject (1633), headed an unsuccessful English mission to the United Provinces of the Netherlands to arrange a political union between the two nations.

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Universalium. 2010.

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