Timon of Athens

▪ work by Shakespeare
      tragedy in five acts by William Shakespeare (Shakespeare, William), probably written sometime in 1605–08 and published in the First Folio of 1623 from an authorial manuscript, probably unfinished. Some parts of the play may be by Thomas Middleton (Middleton, Thomas). It belongs to Shakespeare's late experimental period, when he explored a new kind of tragic form.

      Unlike the plots of his great tragedies, the story of Timon of Athens is simple and lacks development. It demonstrates events in the life of Timon, a man known for his great and universal generosity, who spends his fortune and then is spurned when he requires help. He puts on a feast, invites his fair-weather friends, serves them warm water, and throws it in their faces. Leaving Athens filled with hatred, he goes to live in a cave. There he is visited by his loyal servant Flavius, by the churlish philosopher Apemantus, and by two mistresses of the general Alcibiades, all of whom sympathize to some degree with Timon's plight, but to no avail; Timon has turned his back on ungrateful humankind. While digging for roots to eat, Timon uncovers gold, most of which he gives to Alcibiades' mistresses and to Alcibiades himself for his war against Athens. Word of his fortune reaches Athens, and, as a variety of Athenians importune Timon again, he curses them and dies.

      For a discussion of this play within the context of Shakespeare's entire corpus, see William Shakespeare: Shakespeare's plays and poems (Shakespeare, William).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Timon von Athen (Shakespeare) — Daten des Dramas Titel: Timon von Athen Originaltitel: The Life of Timon of Athens Gattung: Tragödie Originalsprache: Englisch …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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