Tigranes II The Great

▪ king of Armenia
Tigranes also spelled  Tigran, or Dikran  
born c. 140
died c. 55 BC

      king of Armenia from 95 to 55 BC, under whom the country became for a short time the strongest state in the Roman East.

      Tigranes was the son or brother of Artavasdes I and a member of the dynasty founded in the early 2nd century by Artaxias. He was given as a hostage to the Parthian king Mithradates II, but later he purchased his freedom by ceding 70 valleys bordering on Media, in northwestern Iran.

      Thereafter, Tigranes began to enlarge his kingdom, first annexing the kingdom of Sophene (east of the upper Euphrates River). He also entered into alliance with Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus, whose daughter Cleopatra he married. The interference of the two kings in Cappadocia (in eastern Asia Minor) was successfully countered by Roman intervention in 92 BC.

      Tigranes then began war with the Parthians, whose empire (southeast of the Caspian Sea) was temporarily weakened after the death of Mithradates II (about 87) by internal dissensions and invasions of the Scythians. Tigranes reconquered the valleys he had ceded and laid waste a great part of Media; the kings of Atropatene (Azerbaijan), Gordyene and Adiabene (both on the Upper Tigris River), and Osroene became his vassals. He also annexed northern Mesopotamia, and in the Caucasus the kings of Iberia (now Georgia) and Albania accepted his suzerainty. In 83 the Syrians, tired of Seleucid dynastic struggles, offered him their crown, and in 78–77 he reoccupied Cappadocia. Tigranes took the title “king of kings” and built a new royal city, Tigranocerta, on the borders of Armenia and Mesopotamia (the actual site is disputed), where he accumulated all his wealth and to which he transplanted the inhabitants of 12 Greek towns of Cappadocia, Cilicia, and Syria.

      In 72 the Romans forced Mithradates of Pontus to flee to Armenia, and, in 69, Roman armies under Lucullus (Lucullus, Lucius Licinius) invaded Armenia. Tigranes was defeated at Tigranocerta on Oct. 6, 69, and again near the former capital of Artaxata in September 68. The recall of Lucullus gave some respite to Mithradates and Tigranes, but in the meantime a son of Tigranes, also called Tigranes, rebelled against him. Although the younger Tigranes was given an army by the Parthian king Phraates III, he was defeated by his father and was forced to flee to the Roman general Pompey. When Pompey (Pompey the Great) advanced into Armenia, Tigranes surrendered (66 BC). Pompey received him graciously and gave him back his kingdom (in exchange for Syria and other southern conquests). Tigranes ruled about 10 years longer over Armenia, as a Roman client-king, though he lost all his conquests except Sophene and Gordyene. He was succeeded by his son Artavasdes II.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tigranes the Great — This article is about a king of Armenia in the 1st century BCE. For other historical figures with the same name (including other kings of Armenia) see Tigranes. Tigranes II King of Armenia Tigranes II …   Wikipedia

  • List of people known as The Great — This is a list of people whose names in English are commonly appended with the phrase the Great , or who were called that or an equivalent phrase in their own language. Other languages have their own suffixes such as e Bozorg and e azam in… …   Wikipedia

  • Pompey the Great — in full Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus born Sept. 29, 106, Rome died Sept. 28, 48 BC, Pelusium, Egypt Statesman and general of the Roman republic. His early military career was illustrious. He fought effectively for Sulla against Marius in the Social War …   Universalium

  • Tigranes II el Grande — Tigranes el Grande Rey de reyes de Armenia y de Asia conocida Estatua de Tigranes Reinado 95 55 a. C. Nombre real Tig …   Wikipedia Español

  • Tigranes I — of Armenia (Armenian: Տիգրան Առաջին) reigned as King of Armenia from 115 BC to 95 BC. Artavasdes I did not leave any heir; his brother, Tigranes ascended to the throne of the Artaxiads. Some historians claim that Tigranes II the Great was the son …   Wikipedia

  • The Diocese of Amida —     The Diocese of Amida     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Diocese of Amida     (DIARBEKIR.)     An Armenian Rite diocese located in Mesopotamia, Asiatic Turkey. The foundation of the city of Amida has been wrongly attributed to Tigranes I, or… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Tigranes V of Armenia — Tigranes V, also known as Tigran V [1] (Greek: Τιγράνης, Armenian: Տիգրան, 16 BC 36) was a Herodian Prince and served as a Roman Client King of Armenia from the years 6 to 12. Contents 1 Family Life in the Herodian Court 2 King of Armenia …   Wikipedia

  • Tigranes VI of Armenia — Tigranes VI, also known as Tigran VI or by his Roman name Gaius Julius Tigranes[1] (Greek: Γαίος Ιούλιος Τιγράνης, Armenian:Տիգրան, before 25 – after 68) was a Herodian Prince and served as a Roman Client King of Armenia in the 1st century.… …   Wikipedia

  • Tigranes II. — Tigranes II. mit der armenischen Tiara auf einer seiner Münzen Tigranes Sta …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tigranes — For the modern Ethiopian ethnic group known as Tigrayans, see Tigray Tigrinya people Tigranes (sometimes Tigran or Dikran; Armenian: Տիգրան; Ancient Greek: Τιγράνης) was the name of a number of historical figures, primarily kings of Armenia. The… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.