Ten Lost Tribes of Israel

      10 of the original 12 Hebrew tribes, which, under the leadership of Joshua, took possession of Canaan, the Promised Land, after the death of Moses. They were named Asher, Dan, Ephraim, Gad, Issachar, Manasseh, Naphtali, Reuben, Simeon, and Zebulun—all sons or grandsons of Jacob. In 930 BC the 10 tribes formed the independent Kingdom of Israel in the north and the 2 other tribes, Judah and Benjamin, set up the Kingdom of Judah in the south. Following the conquest of the northern kingdom by the Assyrians in 721 BC, the 10 tribes were gradually assimilated by other peoples and thus disappeared from history. Nevertheless, a belief persisted that one day the Ten Lost Tribes would be found. Eldad ha-Dani, for instance, a 9th-century Jewish traveler, reported locating the tribes “beyond the rivers of Abyssinia” on the far side of an impassable river called Sambation, a roaring torrent of stones that becomes subdued only on the sabbath, when Jews are not permitted to travel. Manasseh ben Israel (1604–57) used the legend of the lost tribes in pleading successfully for admission of Jews into England during Oliver Cromwell's regime. Peoples who at various times were said to be descendants of the lost tribes include the Nestorians, the Mormons, the Afghans, the Falashas of Ethiopia, the American Indians, and the Japanese. Among the numerous immigrants to the State of Israel since its establishment in 1948 were a few who likewise claimed to be remnants of the Ten Lost Tribes. The descendants of the tribes of Judah and Benjamin have survived as Jews because they were allowed to return to their homeland after the Babylonian Exile of 586 BC.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ten Lost Tribes of Israel — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Ten Lost Tribes — The phrase Ten Lost Tribes of Israel refers to the ancient Tribes of Israel that disappeared from the Biblical account after the Kingdom of Israel was destroyed, enslaved and exiled by ancient Assyria. [… …   Wikipedia

  • TEN LOST TRIBES — TEN LOST TRIBES, legend concerning the fate of the ten tribes constituting the northern Kingdom of Israel. The Kingdom of Israel, consisting of the ten tribes (the twelve tribes excluding Judah and Benjamin who constituted the southern Kingdom of …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Lost Tribes — noun the ten Tribes of Israel that were deported into captivity in Assyria around 720 BC (leaving only the tribes of Judah and Benjamin) • Hypernyms: ↑Tribes of Israel, ↑Twelve Tribes of Israel * * * the members of the ten tribes of ancient… …   Useful english dictionary

  • lost tribes — n. the ten tribes of Israel carried off into Assyrian captivity about 722 B.C.: 2 Kings 17:6 …   English World dictionary

  • LOST TRIBES —    the ten tribes of the race of Israel whom the Assyrians carried off into captivity (see 2 Kings xvii. 6), and of whom all trace has been lost, and only in recent years guessed at …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • lost tribes — the members of the ten tribes of ancient Israel who were taken into captivity in 722 B.C. by Sargon II of Assyria and are believed never to have returned to Palestine. II Kings 17:1 23. * * * …   Universalium

  • Twelve Tribes of Israel —       in the Bible, the Hebrew people who, after the death of Moses, took possession of the Promised Land of Canaan under the leadership of Joshua. Because the tribes were named after sons or grandsons of Jacob, whose name was changed to Israel… …   Universalium

  • The Lost Tribes — infobox television show name = The Lost Tribes caption = format = Reality runtime = approx 60 (plus commercials) creator = Nine Network starring = country = Australia network = Channel Nine first aired = 6 May 2007 last aired = 10 June 2007 num… …   Wikipedia

  • TRIBES, THE TWELVE — TRIBES, THE TWELVE, the traditional division of Israel into 12 tribes: Reuben, Simeon (Levi), Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Benjamin, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Ephraim, and Manasseh. Biblical tradition holds that the 12 tribes of Israel are… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

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