Swahili literature

Swahili also called  kiSwahili , or  Kiswahili 

      that body of creative writing done in Swahili, a Bantu language of Africa. The earliest preserved Swahili writing, from the early 18th century, is written in Arabic script, and subsequent writings were primarily in three main dialects: kiUnjuga, kiMvita, and kiAmu. In the 1930s, British colonial authorities, with some assistance from local African scholars and writers, formally began to standardize the language, choosing the dialect spoken in Zanzibar Town (kiUnjuga) as the basis for the Swahili to be used in publishing and education throughout East Africa. At first, fiction in Swahili mainly consisted of stories inspired by indigenous oral narrative traditions, Arabic tales, and translations of works by European writers. An important exception was James Mbotela's 1934 historical novel Uhuru wa Watumwa (“Freedom for the Slaves”), but it was the writing of Shaaban Robert (Robert, Shaaban) (1909–62) that really gave impetus to a literature in the new Standard Swahili. The works of this Tanganyikan poet, novelist, and essayist gained wide circulation in the 1940s, '50s, and '60s and are held in high esteem in East Africa today. Two other important writers from this period were the Zanzibaris Muhammed Saleh Farsy, whose novel Kurwa na Doto (1960; “Kurwa and Doto”) is a minor classic, and Muhammed Said Abdulla (Abdulla, Muhammed Said), whose first story of a series of detective adventures, Mzimu wa Watu wa Kale (1960; “Shrine of the Ancestors”), marked the beginning of a transition toward a Swahili fiction that reflected the East African experience of industrialization, westernization, and the struggle for self-government and development of the post-independence society. With the 1965 success of the Tanzanian Faraji Katalambulla's crime thriller Simu ya Kifo (“Death Call”), that transition was pretty well completed; after the mid-1960s, Swahili publishing grew dramatically.

      Romances, detective fiction, and traditional tales continue to be the mainstay of the literature, but there are several novels and plays that examine historical events and contemporary social and political problems in a sophisticated and stylistically elegant manner. Swahili-language translations now also include works by African as well as Western writers. Authors who have received local and international acclaim include the novelists Euphrase Kezilahabi and Mohammed S. Mohammed and the dramatists Ebrahim Hussein and Penina O. Mlama of Tanzania, as well as the Kenyan novelists Ali Jemaadar Amir, Katama Mkangi, and P.M. Kareithi.

      In addition to creative writing, there has been a long tradition of historical writing in Swahili, antedating the colonial era. In more recent times, linguistic studies and a body of literary criticism in the language have begun to develop and grow.

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Universalium. 2010.

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