Sorel, Georges

▪ French revolutionary
born Nov. 2, 1847, Cherbourg, France
died Aug. 30, 1922, Boulogne-sur-Seine

      French Socialist and revolutionary syndicalist who developed an original and provocative theory on the positive, even creative, role of myth and violence in the historical process.

      Sorel was born of a middle-class family and trained as a civil engineer. Not until he reached age 40 did he become interested in social and economic questions. In 1892 he retired from his civil-service engineering post and devoted himself to a life of meditation and study. In 1893 he discovered Marxism and began writing the analytical critiques that constitute his most original and valuable achievement.

      In 1897 Sorel was a passionate defender of Alfred Dreyfus, the Jewish army officer who was wrongly convicted of treason, but he became disgusted with the way the parties of the left exploited “the Affair” for their own political advancement. By 1902 he was denouncing the Socialist and Radical parties for advocating democracy and constitutionalism as a road to Socialism. Instead, he enthusiastically supported revolutionary syndicalism, a movement with anarchistic leanings that stressed the spontaneity of the class struggle. His best known work, Réflexions sur la violence (1908; Reflections on Violence), first appeared as a series of articles in Le Mouvement Socialiste early in 1906 and has been widely translated. Here Sorel developed his notions of myth (modeled on the syndicalist vision of the general strike) and of violence. Violence for Sorel was the revolutionary denial of the existing social order, and force was the state's power of coercion. (His theory was later perverted and utilized by the Italian Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini.)

      Throughout Sorel's thought there runs a moralistic hatred of social decadence and resignation. He attacked the idea of inevitable progress, as developed by 18th-century philosophers, in his work Les Illusions du progrès (1908; “Illusions of Progress”) and believed that the future was what men chose to make it. Departing from the intellectual tradition of European Socialism, Sorel held that human nature was not innately good; he therefore concluded that a satisfactory social order was not likely to evolve but would have to be brought about by revolutionary action (Action Française). After 1909 Sorel became disenchanted with the syndicalist movement, and, with some hesitation, he adhered, not without embarrassment and hesitation, to the monarchist movement—Action Française—which sought to reestablish a homogeneous and traditional moral order. With the outbreak of the Russian Revolution in 1917, Sorel declared himself for the Bolsheviks, who he thought might be capable of precipitating the moral regeneration of mankind.

      Sorel wrote on an extraordinarily broad range of topics, including the Bible, Aristotle, and the decline of Rome, in addition to his writings on Socialism. Among his chief works are L'Avenir socialiste des syndicats (1898; “The Socialist Future of the Syndicalists”), Les Illusions du progrès (1908; “Illusions of Progress”), and La Révolution dreyfusienne (1909; “The Dreyfusard Revolution”).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sorel, Georges — (1847 1922)    social philosopher, journalist    Born in Cherbourg and educated at the École polytechnique in Paris, Georges Sorel was a civil engineer until 1892, when he became a contributor to several socialist journals. Denouncing the… …   France. A reference guide from Renaissance to the Present

  • Sorel, Georges — (1847–1922) French engineer, philosopher, and social theorist. Sorel is principally remembered for Réflexions sur la violence (1908, trs. as Reflections on Violence, 1914). Sorel argues that one cannot deplore violence in the hands of opponents… …   Philosophy dictionary

  • Sorel, Georges — (1847–1922)    One of the most original and controversial thinkers linked to the Marxist tradition, Sorel was for a time the leading theoretician of revolutionary syndicalism. Born in Cherbourg, France and educated at the École Polytechnique in… …   Historical dictionary of Marxism

  • Sorel, Georges — (1847 1922) After a long career as an engineer in France, Sorel resigned to become an independent scholar, and in the thirty five years before his death published a stream of books and articles on social theory, Marxism, and the philosophy of the …   Dictionary of sociology

  • SOREL, Georges — (1847 1922)    French Marxist journalist, philosopher, anarchist and revolutionary syndicalist who rejected RATIONALISM and through the work of BERGSON eventually developed a MYSTICAL NATIONALISM. Praising both STALIN and MUSSOLINI, he was… …   Concise dictionary of Religion

  • Sorel, Georges — See Marxism ( …   History of philosophy

  • Sorel, Georges — ► (1847 1922) Economista, historiador, filósofo y político francés. Obras: El futuro socialista de los sindicatos (1898) y Reflexiones sobre la violencia (1908), entre otras …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Sorel, Georges (-Eugène) — born Nov. 2, 1847, Cherbourg, France died Aug. 30, 1922, Boulogne sur Seine French author and revolutionary. Trained as a civil engineer, he was 40 before he became interested in social issues. He discovered Marxism in 1893 but was disgusted by… …   Universalium

  • Sorel, Georges (-Eugène) — (2 nov. 1847, Cherburgo, Francia–30 ago. 1922, Boulogne sur Seine). Autor y revolucionario francés. Formado como ingeniero civil, cumplió los 40 años de edad antes de interesarse en temas sociales. Descubrió el marxismo en 1893, pero le repugnó… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Sorel — Sorel, Georges …   Philosophy dictionary

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