Slovak literature

      the body of literature produced in the Slovak language. Until the 18th century there was no systematic attempt to establish a literary language on the basis of the Slovak dialects, which, though closely related to Czech, had developed a separate identity from the early Middle Ages. The decline of literary Czech in the early 18th century, however, generated an increase of local colouring in devotional texts in Slovakia. Shortly after, Anton Bernolák produced a grammar (1790) and dictionary (1825–27) of the Slovak language and codified its literary usage. In an era of reviving national consciousness, this language was taken up by a number of writers, above all Ján Hollý, who used Slovak to produce lyrics, idylls, and national epics. Jozef Ignác Bajza's novel René (1783–85), using Slovakized Czech, also had a strong impact.

      In the early 19th century, literary Slovak was greatly refined by the linguist and patriot L'udovít Štúr. The “new” language was used by a group of talented poets. Among them was Andrej Sládkovič (Andrej Braxatoris), who wrote the national epic Marína (1846), and Janko Král', a poet and revolutionary whose ballads, epics, and lyrics were among the most original products of Slavonic Romanticism.

      The beginnings of Slovak drama appeared in the comedies of Ján Palárik in the 1850s and '60s, and the novel matured in the work of Martin Kukučín. In the period before World War I, the lyric poet Hviezdoslav (Pavol Országh) enriched the language with original works and numerous translations. Another notable poet was Ivan Krasko (the pseudonym of Ján Botto), whose volumes of verse, Nox et solitudo (1909) and Verše (1912), were among the finest achievements of Slovak literature.

      After 1918 Slovak literature came of age. Its lyrical poets—including Martin Rázus, Emil Boleslav Lukáč, Janko Jesenský, and Ján Smrek (Ján Cietek)—were the most acclaimed. In the novel, the rural tales of Timrava (Božena Slančíkova), a vast chronicle of 20th-century Slovakia by Milo Urban, and the lyrical prose of Margita Figuli were outstanding. As with literary Czech, Slovak writing underwent a general decline during the four decades of communist rule after World War II.

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Universalium. 2010.

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