Prussian Civil Code

byname of  German Allgemeines Landrecht 

      (“General State Law”), the law of the Prussian states, begun during the reign of Frederick the Great (1740–86) but not promulgated until 1794 under his successor, Frederick William II. It was to be enforced wherever it did not conflict with local customs. The code was adopted by other German states in the 19th century and remained in force until it was replaced by the civil code of the German empire effected in 1900 (see German Civil Code).

      The Prussian Civil Code, a product of the 18th-century Enlightenment, contained many elements of constitutional and administrative law. It attempted to be totally comprehensive, its 17,000 paragraphs aiming at a final solution for every legal situation so as to avoid interpretation by judges.

      The code rose out of the reforms of Frederick the Great (Frederick II), who felt that even in an absolute monarchy there should be prompt and impartial administration of justice to protect the subject against the arbitrary will of the prince. Yet, instead of bridging the gulf between the social classes, distinctions were carefully preserved in the interests of the state. To the nobility, from which came the army officers and the higher bureaucracy, was reserved the exclusive ownership of manorial estates. The business class was to devote itself to trade and industry—activities forbidden to the nobility. The peasantry paid the bulk of the direct taxes and supplied the army's foot soldiers; they were, therefore, to be protected against encroachments from the lords of the manor.

      Freedom of conscience and religion was granted, but the state determined which religions were permitted. Censorship was rigidly imposed on all but academics. Political dissenters were subject to severe penalties.

      The aim of the criminal law was to prevent crime rather than punish it, and for that reason torture was abolished, and the death penalty was dropped for many crimes. The overriding interest was considered to be the security and welfare of the community.

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Universalium. 2010.

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