Pereyaslav Agreement

Russia [1654]
Pereyaslav also spelled  PerejasŁaw 

      (Jan. 18 [Jan. 8, Old Style], 1654), act undertaken by the rada (council) of the Cossack army in Ukraine to submit Ukraine to Russian rule, and the acceptance of this act by emissaries of the Russian tsar Alexis; the agreement precipitated a war between Poland and Russia (1654–67).

      The hetman of the Zaporozhian Cossacks, Bohdan Khmelnytsky (Khmelnytsky, Bohdan), had been leading a revolt against Polish rule in Ukraine since 1648. In 1651, in the face of a growing threat from Poland and forsaken by his Tatar allies, Khmelnytsky asked the tsar to incorporate Ukraine as an autonomous duchy under Russian protection. The Russians were reluctant to enter into such an agreement, and it was not until October 1653 that a Russian zemsky sobor (“assembly of the land”) approved the request and Alexis sent a delegation, headed by V.V. Buturlin, to the Cossacks.

      Only after the Cossacks had suffered a disastrous military defeat (December 1653), however, did the rada receive the Muscovite delegation at Pereyaslav and formally submit to “the tsar's hand.” Two months later (March 1654), the details of the union were negotiated in Moscow. The Cossacks were granted a large degree of autonomy, and they, as well as other social groups in Ukraine, retained all the rights and privileges they had enjoyed under Polish rule. But the unification of Ukraine with Russia was unacceptable to Poland; a Russo-Polish war (Thirteen Years' War) broke out and ended with the division of Ukraine between Poland and Russia. See also Andrusovo, Truce of.

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Universalium. 2010.

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