Lithuania, grand duchy of

▪ historical state, Europe
      state, incorporating Lithuania proper, Belorussia, and the western Ukraine, which became one of the most influential powers in eastern Europe (14th–16th century). Pressed by the crusading Teutonic and Livonian Knights, the Lithuanian tribes united under Mindaugas (d. 1263) and formed a strong, cohesive grand duchy during the reign of Gediminas (reigned 1316–41), who extended their frontiers across the upper Dvina River in the northeast to the Dnieper River in the southeast and to the Pripet Marshes in the south. After Gediminas' death, two of his sons succeeded him: Kęstutis ruled Lithuania proper, preventing territorial encroachments from the German knights and their allies, while Algirdas, the titular grand duke, continued his father's expansionist policies and, by conquering vast Russian and Tatar territories, stretched his domain from the Baltic to the Black Sea.

      Influenced greatly by their Russian subjects, the Lithuanians not only reorganized their army, government administration, and legal and financial systems on Russian models but also allowed the Russian nobility to retain its Orthodox religion, its privileges, and its local authority.

      The Lithuanians, however, also remained involved with their western neighbours; in 1385, under pressure from the hostile Teutonic Knights, the grand duke Jogaila (Władysław II Jagiełło) (reigned 1377–1434) concluded a pact with Poland (Union of Krewo), agreeing to accept the Roman Catholic faith, marry the Polish queen, become king of Poland, and unite Poland and Lithuania under a single ruler. Jogaila took the Polish name Władysław II Jagiełło.

      Polish influence subsequently began to replace Russian influence in Lithuania. The grand duchy, however, retained its autonomy, and, under the rule of Vytautas (Vytautas the Great), Jogaila's cousin and former political rival, who was named viceroy in 1392, it expanded to the Ugra and Oka rivers in the east, assumed a dominant role in Tatar and east Russian political affairs, and became the most powerful state in eastern Europe. In 1410 Lithuania, led by Vytautas, also joined Poland and decisively defeated the Teutonic Knights (Teutonic Order) (Battle of Tannenberg). As a result, it gained control of the northwestern territory of Samogitia (confirmed in 1422) and permanently reduced the German threat to Lithuania.

      After Vytautas' death (1430), Lithuania continued to have its own rulers, who were nominally subordinate to the Polish king but maintained Lithuania's autonomy and its authority in eastern European affairs. When the Poles chose the 19-year-old Lithuanian grand duke Casimir (Casimir IV) as their king (1447), the two countries became somewhat more closely associated. Casimir, however, in an attempt to guarantee Lithuania's independent status, granted a charter to the Lithuanian boyars who had proclaimed him grand duke (1447), verifying the nobles' rights and privileges, giving them extensive authority over the peasantry, and thereby increasing their political power.

      The authority of the grand duke subsequently declined, and, without its strong ruler, Lithuania was unable to prevent the Tatars from continually raiding its southern lands; nor could it stop Muscovy (Moscow, Grand Principality of) from annexing the principalities of Novgorod (1479) and Tver (1485), which had maintained close relations with Lithuania, from seizing one-third of Lithuania's Russian lands (1499–1503), and from capturing Smolensk (1514), which Lithuania had held since 1408.

      During the 16th century Lithuania made major economic advances, including agrarian reforms, and generally appeared to maintain itself as a strong, dynamic state. When the wars between Muscovy and Lithuania were resumed in the Livonian War (q.v.; 1558–83), however, Lithuania's resources were strained, and it was forced to appeal to Poland for help. The Poles refused unless the two states were formally united. Lithuanian resistance to a union was strong, but, when Sigismund II Augustus (grand duke of Lithuania 1544–72; king of Poland 1548–72) attached one-third of Lithuania's territories (Volhynia, Kiev, Bratslav, and Podlasia) to Poland, the Lithuanians had to accept the Union of Lublin (Lublin, Union of) (1569).

      Under the terms of the union, Lithuania officially remained a distinct state, constituting an equal partner with Poland in a Polish-Lithuanian confederation. Nevertheless, it soon became the subordinate member of the new state. Its gentry adopted Polish customs and language; its administration organized itself on Polish models and pursued Polish policies. Although the peasants retained their Lithuanian identity, Lithuania was politically an integral part of Poland from 1569 until the end of the 18th century, when the partitions of Poland placed it in the Russian Empire.

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Universalium. 2010.

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