Kropotkin, Peter Alekseyevich

▪ Russian revolutionary
Introduction
born December 21 [December 9, Old Style], 1842, Moscow, Russia
died February 8, 1921, Dmitrov, near Moscow
 Russian revolutionary and geographer, the foremost theorist of the anarchist (anarchism) movement. Although he achieved renown in a number of different fields, ranging from geography and zoology to sociology and history, he shunned material success for the life of a revolutionist.

Early life and conversion to anarchism
      The son of Prince Aleksey Petrovich Kropotkin, Peter Kropotkin was educated in the exclusive Corps of Pages in St. Petersburg (Saint Petersburg). For a year he served as an aide to Tsar Alexander II (Alexander II) and, from 1862 to 1867, as an army officer in Siberia, where, apart from his military duties, he studied animal life and engaged in geographic exploration. On the basis of his observations, he elaborated a theory of the structural lines of mountain ranges that revised the cartography of eastern Asia. He also contributed to knowledge of the glaciation of Asia and Europe during the Ice Age.

      Kropotkin's findings won him immediate recognition and opened the way to a distinguished scientific career. But in 1871 he refused the secretaryship of the Russian Geographical Society and, renouncing his aristocratic heritage, dedicated his life to the cause of social justice. During his Siberian service he already had begun his conversion to anarchism—the doctrine that all forms of government should be abolished—and in 1872 a visit to the Swiss watchmakers of the Jura Mountains, whose voluntary associations of mutual support won his admiration, reinforced his beliefs. On his return to Russia he joined a revolutionary group, the Chaiykovsky Circle, that disseminated propaganda among the workers and peasants of St. Petersburg and Moscow. At this time he wrote "Must We Occupy Ourselves with an Examination of the Ideal of a Future System?," an anarchist analysis of a postrevolutionary order in which decentralized cooperative organizations would take over the functions normally performed by governments. Caught in a police dragnet, he was imprisoned in 1874 but made a sensational escape two years later, fleeing to western Europe, where his name soon became revered in radical circles. The next few years were spent mostly in Switzerland until he was expelled at the demand of the Russian government after the assassination of Tsar Alexander II by revolutionaries in 1881. He moved to France but was arrested and imprisoned for three years on trumped-up charges of sedition. Released in 1886, he settled in England, where he remained until the Russian Revolution (Russian Revolution of 1917) of 1917 allowed him to return to his native country.

Philosopher of revolution
      During his long exile, Kropotkin wrote a series of influential works, the most important being "Paroles d'un révolté" (1885; “Words of a Rebel”), In Russian and French Prisons (1887), The Conquest of Bread (1892), Fields, Factories and Workshops (1899), Memoirs of a Revolutionist (1899), Mutual Aid (1902), Russian Literature (1905), and The Great French Revolution 1789–1793 (1909). In recognition of his scholarship, Kropotkin was invited to write an article on anarchism for the 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. (Encyclopædia Britannica)

      Kropotkin's aim, as he often remarked, was to provide anarchism with a scientific basis. In Mutual Aid, which is widely regarded as his masterpiece, he argued that, despite the Darwinian concept of the survival of the fittest, cooperation rather than conflict is the chief factor in the evolution of species. Providing abundant examples, he showed that sociability is a dominant feature at every level of the animal world. Among humans, too, he found that mutual aid has been the rule rather than the exception. He traced the evolution of voluntary cooperation from the primitive tribe, peasant village, and medieval commune to a variety of modern associations—trade unions, learned societies, the Red Cross—that have continued to practice mutual support despite the rise of the coercive bureaucratic state. The trend of modern history, he believed, was pointing back toward decentralized, nonpolitical, cooperative societies in which people could develop their creative faculties without interference from rulers, clerics, or soldiers.

      In his theory of “anarchist communism,” according to which private property and unequal incomes would be replaced by the free distribution of goods and services, Kropotkin took a major step in the development of anarchist economic thought. For the principle of wages he substituted the principle of needs. Each person would be the judge of his own requirements, taking from the common storehouse whatever he deemed necessary, whether or not he contributed a share of the labour. Kropotkin envisioned a society in which people would do both manual and mental work, both in industry and in agriculture. Members of each cooperative community would work from their 20s to their 40s, four or five hours a day sufficing for a comfortable life, and the division of labour would yield a variety of pleasant jobs, resulting in the sort of integrated, organic existence that had prevailed in the medieval city.

      To prepare people for this happier life, Kropotkin pinned his hopes on the education of (education, philosophy of) the young. To achieve an integrated society, he called for education that would cultivate both mental and manual skills. Due emphasis was to be placed on the humanities and on mathematics and science, but, instead of being taught from books alone, children were to receive an active outdoor education and to learn by doing and observing firsthand, a recommendation that has been widely endorsed by modern educational theorists. Drawing on his own experience of prison life, Kropotkin also advocated a thorough modification of the penal system (penology). Prisons, he said, were “schools of crime” that, far from reforming the offender, subjected him to brutalizing punishments and hardened him in his criminal ways. In the future anarchist world, antisocial behaviour would be dealt with not by laws and prisons but by human understanding and the moral pressure of the community.

      Kropotkin combined the qualities of a scientist and moralist with those of a revolutionary organizer and propagandist. For all his mild benevolence, he condoned the use of violence in the struggle for freedom and equality, and, during his early years as an anarchist militant, he was among the most vigorous exponents of “propaganda by the deed”—acts of insurrection that would supplement oral and written propaganda and help to awaken the rebellious instincts of the people. He was the principal founder of both the English and Russian anarchist movements and exerted a strong influence on the movements in France, Belgium, and Switzerland. But he alienated many of his comrades by supporting the Allied powers during World War I. His action, though prompted by the fear that German authoritarianism might prove fatal to social progress, violated the strong antimilitarist tradition among anarchists and touched off bitter polemics that nearly destroyed the movement for which he had laboured nearly half a century.

Return to Russia
      Events took an unexpected turn with the outbreak of the Russian Revolution in 1917 (Russian Revolution of 1917). Kropotkin, by this time age 74, hastened to return to his homeland. When he arrived in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) in June 1917 after 40 years in exile, he was greeted warmly and offered the ministry of education in the provisional government, a post he brusquely declined. Yet his hopes for the future were never brighter, because in 1917 the organizations that he thought might form the basis of a stateless society—the communes and soviets, or soldiers' and workers' councils—suddenly began to appear in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

      With the Bolshevik seizure of power in October 1917, however, his earlier enthusiasm turned to bitter disappointment. “This buries the revolution,” he remarked to a friend. The Bolsheviks (Bolshevik), he said, have shown how the revolution was not to be made—that is, by authoritarian rather than libertarian methods. Kropotkin's last years were devoted chiefly to writing a history of ethics, one volume of which was completed. He also fostered an anarchist cooperative in the village of Dmitrov, north of Moscow, where he died in 1921. His funeral, attended by tens of thousands of admirers, was the last occasion in the Soviet era when the black flag of anarchism was paraded through the Russian capital.

      Kropotkin's life exemplified the high ethical standard and the combination of thought and action that he preached throughout his writings. He displayed none of the egotism, duplicity, or lust for power that marred the image of so many other revolutionaries. Because of this he was admired not only by his own comrades but by many for whom the label of anarchist meant little more than the dagger and the bomb. The French writer Romain Rolland (Rolland, Romain) said that Kropotkin lived what Leo Tolstoy (Tolstoy, Leo) only advocated, and Oscar Wilde (Wilde, Oscar) called him one of the two really happy men he had known.

Paul Avrich Martin A. Miller

Additional Reading
The standard biography is George Woodcock and Ivan Avakumović, The Anarchist Prince (1950, reissued as Peter Kropotkin, 1990). See also Martin A. Miller, Kropotkin (1976); and Caroline Cahm, Kropotkin and the Rise of Revolutionary Anarchism, 1872–1886 (1989).

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Kropotkin, Peter (Alekseyevich) — born Dec. 21, 1842, Moscow, Russia died Feb. 8, 1921, Dmitrov, near Moscow Russian revolutionary and geographer, foremost theorist of anarchism. The son of a prince, he renounced his aristocratic heritage in 1871. Although he achieved renown in… …   Universalium

  • Alekseyevich — (as used in expressions) Balakirev Mily Alekseyevich Brusilov Aleksey Alekseyevich Bunin Ivan Alekseyevich Fyodor Alekseyevich Gagarin Yury Alekseyevich Ivan Alekseyevich Kropotkin Peter Alekseyevich Pyotr Alekseyevich * * * …   Universalium

  • Kropotkin — /kroh pot kin, kreuh /; Russ. /krddu pawt kyin/, n. Prince Pëter Alekseevich /pyawtrdd u lyi ksyay yi vyich/, 1842 1921, Russian geographer, author, and anarchist. * * * ▪ Russia       city, Krasnodar kray (territory), western Russia, on the… …   Universalium

  • peter — peter1 /pee teuhr/, v.i. peter out 1. to diminish gradually and stop; dwindle to nothing: The hot water always peters out in the middle of my shower. 2. to tire; exhaust (usually used as a past participle): I m petered out after that walk. [1805… …   Universalium

  • Peter — /pee teuhr/, n. 1. Also called Simon Peter. died A.D. 67?, one of the 12 apostles and the reputed author of two of the Epistles. 2. either of these two Epistles in the New Testament, I Peter or II Peter. 3. a word formerly used in communications… …   Universalium

  • Piotr Kropotkin — Para la ciudad del krai de Krasnodar, en Rusia, véase Kropotkin (ciudad). Piotr Kropotkin Piotr Kropotkin fotografiado por Nadar …   Wikipedia Español

  • anarchism — /an euhr kiz euhm/, n. 1. a doctrine urging the abolition of government or governmental restraint as the indispensable condition for full social and political liberty. 2. the methods or practices of anarchists, as the use of violence to undermine …   Universalium

  • Ba Jin — /bah jin /, (Li Feigan) born 1904, Chinese writer and novelist. * * * ▪ 2006 Li Yaotang        Chinese writer (b. Nov. 25, 1904, Chengdu, Sichuan province, China d. Oct. 17, 2005, Shanghai, China), was one of the most critically acclaimed and… …   Universalium

  • socialism — /soh sheuh liz euhm/, n. 1. a theory or system of social organization that advocates the vesting of the ownership and control of the means of production and distribution, of capital, land, etc., in the community as a whole. 2. procedure or… …   Universalium

  • communism — /kom yeuh niz euhm/, n. 1. a theory or system of social organization based on the holding of all property in common, actual ownership being ascribed to the community as a whole or to the state. 2. (often cap.) a system of social organization in… …   Universalium

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