Kakiemon ware

      Japanese porcelain made primarily during the Tokugawa period (1603–1867) by the Sakaida family, who established kilns at Arita, near the port of Imari in the province of Hizen (now in Saga prefecture). Typical dishes, bowls, and vases have octagonal, hexagonal, or square shapes, perhaps because these shapes give less evidence of warping in the kiln than do circular ones. Wares were painted in a pale underglaze blue until the family learned the Chinese secret of using overglaze colours. Sakaida Kakiemon I perfected this overglaze technique at Arita in the Kan'ei era (1624–43). It was continued by his family, and, since many of them were also called Kakiemon, the style has become known by that name. Characteristic colours are iron red, light blue, bluish green, and yellow, and sometimes a little gilding. Themes from between about 1680 and 1720 are markedly asymmetrical, with much of the white porcelain left untouched. The most famous Kakiemon decorative device shows sprigs of foliage and little quails—called the quail pattern. This was exported to Europe by Dutch merchants and significantly influenced the early decorative styles of several European factories, including Chelsea, Bow, and Worcester in England; Meissen in Germany; and Chantilly in France. Designs known as the “Tiger and Wheatsheaf” and the “Hob in the Well” are also characteristic. European copies of Kakiemon porcelain were so abundant that they are much more familiar to the West than are the original Kakiemon wares, which are very scarce.

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Universalium. 2010.

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