Isaiah, Book of

also spelled  Isaias,  

      one of the major prophetical writings of the Old Testament. The superscription identifies Isaiah as the son of Amoz and his book as “the vision of Isaiah . . . concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah.” According to 6:1, Isaiah received his call “in the year that King Uzziah died” (742 BC), and his latest recorded activity is dated in 701 BC. Only chapters 1–39, however, can be assigned to this period. Chapters 40–66 are much later in origin and therefore known as Deutero-Isaiah (Second Isaiah). Sometimes a further distinction is made between Deutero-Isaiah (chapters 40–55) and Trito-Isaiah (chapters 56–66).

      Chapters 1–39 consist of numerous sayings and reports of Isaiah along with several narratives about the prophet that are attributed to his disciples. The growth of the book (1–39) was a gradual process, its final form dating from perhaps as late as the 5th century BC, a date suggested by the arrangement of the materials and the late additions. In spite of the lengthy and complicated literary history of the book, however, Isaiah's message is clearly discernible. He was much influenced by the cult in Jerusalem, and the exalted view of Yahweh in the Zion traditions is reflected in his message. He was convinced that only an unshakable trust in Yahweh, rather than in political or military alliances, could protect Judah and Jerusalem from the advances of their enemies—specifically, in this period, the Assyrians. He called for a recognition of the sovereignty of Yahweh and passionately denounced anything that worked against or obscured Yahweh's purposes—from social injustices to meaningless cultic observances. Although Isaiah pronounced Yahweh's judgment upon Judah and Jerusalem for their unfaithfulness, he also announced a new future for those who relied on Yahweh.

       Deutero-Isaiah (40–55), consisting of a collection of oracles, songs, and discourses, dates from the Babylonian Exile (6th century BC). The anonymous prophet is in exile and looks forward to the deliverance of his people. The destruction of Babylon is prophesied and the return of the exiles to their homeland is promised. The servant-of-Yahweh songs in Deutero-Isaiah (42:1–4; 49:1–6; 50:4–9; 52:13–53:12) have generated animated discussions among scholars, but the ideas reflected in the songs suggest that they were written under the influence of the ideology of the king—the anointed one who, through his righteous rule, had the power to effect his people's deliverance.

      Trito-Isaiah (56–66), coming from a still later period, reflects a Palestinian point of view, with the latter chapters in particular addressed to the cultic concerns of the restored community. The diversity of materials in these chapters suggests multiple authorship. How the three “Isaiahs” came together is not known.

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Universalium. 2010.

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