Holdheim, Samuel

▪ German rabbi
born 1806, Kempen, Prussia [now Kępno, Poland]
died Aug. 22, 1860, Berlin [now in Germany]

      German rabbi who became a founder and leader of radical Reform Judaism. His theological positions were radical even within the Reform movement.

      From 1836 to 1840 Holdheim officiated as a rabbi at Frankfurt an der Oder. In 1840 he went as Landesrabbiner (rabbi of a whole province) to Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Three years later he published his controversial and important book Ueber die Autonomie der Rabbinen (“The Autonomy of the Rabbis”). In this work he concluded that Jewish marriage and divorce laws were obsolete because they represented the national aspect of Judaism (no longer valid) as against its enduring religious aspect. Such laws, he held, should be superseded by the laws of the state, for Judaism is a religion only, whose essential core is to be found in biblical ethics and doctrine. During the rabbinical conferences of 1844–46, which elaborated the ideology of Reform Judaism, Holdheim played a dominant role.

      In 1847 he became rabbi of the Jüdische Reformgenossenschaft (“Congregation of the Jewish Reform Alliance”) in Berlin, where, for Reform Jews, he established Sunday as the day of worship and, except for Rosh Hashana (the Jewish New Year), abolished keeping the second day of holidays. Holdheim's writings form part of the classical literature of Reform Judaism, although few of his ideas are generally accepted within the movement today.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • HOLDHEIM, SAMUEL — (1806–1860), leader of reform judaism in Germany. Born in Kempno near Poznan, Holdheim received a talmudic education, but began to study German and secular subjects after marrying a woman with a modern education, daughter of a Poznan rabbi. The… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Holdheim, Samuel — (1806 60)    German Reform leader. He was born in Kempno near Posen. He served as a rabbi in Frankfurt an der Oder, Mecklenburg Schwerin, and Berlin. He advocated radical reform at rabbinical conferences in Braunschweig (1844), Frankfurt am Main… …   Dictionary of Jewish Biography

  • Holdheim — Samuel Holdheim (* 1806 in Kempen (Provinz Posen), heute Kępno, Polen; † 22. August 1860 in Berlin) war ein jüdischer Gelehrter und Rabbiner. Samuel Holdheim war Rabbiner in Frankfurt (Oder), dann Landesrabbiner von Mecklenburg Schwerin, wurde… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Samuel Holdheim — (* 1806 in Kempen (Provinz Posen), heute Kępno, Polen; † 22. August 1860 in Berlin) war ein jüdischer Gelehrter und Rabbiner. Samuel Holdheim war Rabbiner in Frankfurt (Oder), dann ab 1840 Landesrabbiner von Mecklenburg Schwerin und wurde 1847… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Holdheim — Holdheim, Samuel, jüd. Gelehrter, geb. 1806 in Kempen (Provinz Posen), gest. 22. Aug. 1860 in Berlin, war Rabbiner in Frankfurt a. O., dann Landesrabbiner von Mecklenburg Schwerin und wurde 1847 Prediger bei der 1845 gegründeten… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Samuel Holdheim — (1806 ndash; 22 August 1860) was a German rabbi and author, and one of the more extreme leaders of the early Reform Judaism movement. Although Holdheim was a pioneer in modern Jewish homiletics, he was often at odds with the Orthodoxy. [(History… …   Wikipedia

  • Samuel Holdheim — (né en 1806, décédé en 1860) fut un des initiateurs importants du judaïsme réformé en Allemagne. Les excès de son réformisme attirèrent de nombreuses critiques, dont celles de Samson Raphael Hirsch. Sommaire 1 L école critique historique 2… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Samuel Holdheim — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Samuel Holdheim (Kempen, Posen 1806 Berlín 1860). Junto a Abraham Geiger, fue el principal rabino reformado, y el que tenía la visión más radical (a diferencia de Geiger cuya opinión era más moderada). De hecho,… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Liste der Biografien/Hol — Biografien: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Reform Judaism — Judaism as observed by Reform Jews. [1900 05] * * * Religious movement that has modified or abandoned many traditional Jewish beliefs and practices in an effort to adapt Judaism to the modern world. It originated in Germany in 1809 and spread to… …   Universalium

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