Hodgkin, Sir Alan

▪ British biophysicist
in full  Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin  
born February 5, 1914, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England
died December 20, 1998, Cambridge
 English physiologist and biophysicist, who received (with Andrew Fielding Huxley (Huxley, Sir Andrew Fielding) and Sir John Eccles (Eccles, Sir John Carew)) the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of the chemical processes responsible for the passage of impulses along individual nerve fibres (axon).

      Hodgkin was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. After conducting radar research (1939–45) for the British Air Ministry, he joined the faculty at Cambridge, where he worked (1945–52) with Huxley on measuring the electrical and chemical behaviour of individual nerve fibres. By inserting microelectrodes into the giant nerve fibres of the squid Loligo forbesi, they were able to show that the electrical potential of a fibre during conduction of an impulse exceeds the potential of the fibre at rest, contrary to the accepted theory, which postulated a breakdown of the nerve membrane during impulse conduction.

      They knew that the activity of a nerve fibre depends on the fact that a large concentration of potassium ions (potassium) is maintained inside the fibre, while a large concentration of sodium ions (sodium) is found in the surrounding solution. Their experimental results (1947) indicated that the nerve membrane allows only potassium to enter the fibre during the resting phase but allows sodium to penetrate when the fibre is excited. (See also action potential.)

      Hodgkin served as a research professor for the Royal Society (1952–69), professor of biophysics at Cambridge (from 1970), chancellor of the University of Leicester (1971–84), and master of Trinity College (1978–85). He was knighted in 1972 and admitted into the Order of Merit (Merit, Order of) in 1973. Publications by Hodgkin include Conduction of the Nervous Impulse (1964) and his autobiography, Chance and Design: Reminiscences of Science in Peace and War (1992).

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hodgkin,Sir Alan Lloyd — Hodg·kin (hŏjʹkĭn), Sir Alan Lloyd. 1914 1998. British physiologist. He shared a 1963 Nobel Prize for research on nerve cells. * * * …   Universalium

  • Hodgkin, Sir Alan Lloyd — ▪ 1999       British physiologist (b. Feb. 5, 1914, Banbury, Eng. d. Dec. 20, 1998, Cambridge, Eng.), shared (along with his countryman Sir Andrew Huxley and Australian scientist Sir John Eccles) the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine… …   Universalium

  • Hodgkin , Sir Alan Lloyd — (1914–) British physiologist Born at Banbury near Oxford, Hodgkin graduated from Cambridge University and became a fellow in 1936. He spent World War II working on radar for the Air Ministry. He then worked at the physiological laboratory at… …   Scientists

  • Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin — Alan Lloyd Hodgkin Pour les articles homonymes, voir Hodgkin. Alan L. Hodgkin. Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin (5 février 1914 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Sir Alan Hodgkin — noun English physiologist who, with Andrew Huxley, discovered the role of potassium and sodium atoms in the transmission of the nerve impulse (1914 1998) • Syn: ↑Hodgkin, ↑Alan Hodgkin, ↑Alan Lloyd Hodgkin • Instance Hypernyms: ↑physiologist …   Useful english dictionary

  • Alan Hodgkin — Alan Lloyd Hodgkin Pour les articles homonymes, voir Hodgkin. Alan L. Hodgkin. Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin (5 février 1914 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Hodgkin — Sir Alan Lloyd …   Scientists

  • Hodgkin — noun 1. English physician who first described Hodgkin s disease (1798 1866) • Syn: ↑Thomas Hodgkin • Instance Hypernyms: ↑doctor, ↑doc, ↑physician, ↑MD, ↑Dr., ↑medico 2 …   Useful english dictionary

  • Alan Lloyd Hodgkin — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Hodgkin. Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin (Banbury, Oxfordshire, 5 février 1914 Cambridge, 20 décembre 1998) fut un physiologiste et biophysicien britannique, lauréat en 1963 du prix Nobel de… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Alan Hodgkin — noun English physiologist who, with Andrew Huxley, discovered the role of potassium and sodium atoms in the transmission of the nerve impulse (1914 1998) • Syn: ↑Hodgkin, ↑Sir Alan Hodgkin, ↑Alan Lloyd Hodgkin • Instance Hypernyms: ↑physiologist …   Useful english dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.