Hague Convention

▪ 1899, 1907
 any of a series of international treaties that issued from international conferences held at The Hague in The Netherlands in 1899 and 1907.

      The first conference was convened at the invitation of Count Mikhail Nikolayevich Muravyov (Muravyov, Mikhail Nikolayevich, Graf), the minister of foreign affairs of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. In his circular of Jan. 11, 1899, Count Muravyov proposed specific topics for consideration: (1) a limitation on the expansion of armed forces and a reduction in the deployment of new armaments, (2) the application of the principles of the Geneva Convention (Geneva Conventions) of 1864 to naval warfare, and (3) a revision of the unratified Brussels Declaration of 1874 regarding the laws and customs of land warfare. The conference met from May 18 to July 29, 1899; 26 nations were represented. Only two American countries participated, the United States and Mexico.

      Although the conference of 1899 failed to achieve its primary objective, the limitation on armaments, it did adopt conventions defining the conditions of a state of belligerency and other customs relating to war on land and sea. Further, three declarations were accepted—one prohibiting the use of asphyxiating gases (chemical weapon), another prohibiting the use of expanding bullets (dumdums), and another prohibiting the discharges of projectiles or explosives from balloons (balloon). Last, and most important, was the adoption of the Convention for the Pacific Settlement of International Disputes, creating the Permanent Court of Arbitration.

      The conference of 1907, though first proposed by U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt (Roosevelt, Theodore), was officially convened by Nicholas II. This conference sat from June 15 to Oct. 18, 1907, and was attended by the representatives of 44 states. Again the proposal for the limitation of armaments was not accepted. The conference did, however, adopt several conventions relating to such matters as the employment of force for the recovery of contract debts; the rights and duties of neutral powers and persons in war on land and sea; the laying of automatic submarine contact mines; the status of enemy merchant ships; bombardment by naval forces in wartime; and the establishment of an international prize court. The conference of 1907 renewed the declaration prohibiting the discharge of projectiles from balloons but did not reaffirm the declarations prohibiting asphyxiating gas and expanding bullets. The final acts of the conference were the unanimous acceptance by the delegates of the principle of compulsory arbitration and the stating of a number of voeux (resolutions), the first of which was the recommendation that another conference be summoned in eight years, thus establishing the concept that the best way to handle international problems was through a series of successive conferences.

      Although the conference scheduled for 1915 failed to meet because of the outbreak of World War I, the conference idea strongly influenced the creation of the more highly organized League of Nations (Nations, League of) after the war.

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Universalium. 2010.

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