Hadfield, Sir Robert Abbott, Baronet

▪ British metallurgist

born Nov. 28, 1858, Sheffield, Yorkshire, Eng.
died Sept. 30, 1940, London
 British metallurgist who developed manganese steel, an alloy of exceptional durability that found uses in the construction of railroad rails and rock-crushing machinery.

      The son of a Sheffield steel manufacturer, Hadfield took an early interest in metallurgy and at the age of 24 became head of the family firm. In 1883 he took out a patent for his process of producing manganese steel. Earlier attempts to alloy steel with manganese produced very brittle alloys. Hadfield also worked on the development of other steel alloys. He was knighted in 1908, became a Fellow of the Royal Society of London the following year, and was created a baronet in 1917. Hadfield's publications include more than 220 technical papers and Metallurgy and Its Influence on Modern Progress: With a Survey of Education and Research (1925), which became a standard reference work.

      Hadfield married in 1894 but had no children, and the baronetcy lapsed.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Hadfield, Sir Robert Abbott — SUBJECT AREA: Metallurgy [br] b. 28 November 1858 Attercliffe, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England d. 30 September 1940 Kingston Hill, Surrey, England [br] English metallurgist and pioneer in alloy steels. [br] Hadfield s father, Robert, set up a… …   Biographical history of technology

  • Robert Hadfield — Infobox Engineer image width = 150px caption = PAGENAME name = PAGENAME nationality = United Kingdom birth date = November 28, 1858 birth place = Sheffield death date = September 30, 1940 death place = Surrey education = spouse = parents =… …   Wikipedia

  • manganese processing — Introduction       preparation of the ore for use in various products.       Manganese (Mn) is a hard, silvery white metal with a melting point of 1,244° C (2,271° F). Ordinarily too brittle to be of structural value itself, it is an essential… …   Universalium

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