Gordon, Judah Leib

▪ Russian writer
also called  Leon Gordon,  byname  Yalag 
born Dec. 7, 1830, Vilnius, Lithuania
died Sept. 16, 1892, St. Petersburg, Russia

      Jewish poet, essayist, and novelist, the leading poet of the Hebrew Enlightenment ( Haskala), whose use of biblical and postbiblical Hebrew resulted in a new and influential style of Hebrew-language poetry.

      After he left Lithuania, Gordon was imprisoned as a political conspirator by the Russian government. After his release he became editor of Ha-Melitz. His early poems dealing with biblical subjects were followed by powerful satires in verse aimed against the harsher aspects of rabbinic Judaism. His last poems reflect bitter disillusionment with the ideals of Haskala, or Jewish Enlightenment. Although of limited poetic talent, Gordon's advocacy of social and religious reforms proved widely influential, and his skillful use of postbiblical idiom increased the flexibility of modern Hebrew. His poems were collected in Kol Shire Yehuda (1883–84) and his stories in Kol Kithbe Yehuda (1889).

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Universalium. 2010.

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