gauge theory

      class of quantum field theory, a mathematical theory involving both quantum mechanics and Einstein's special theory of relativity that is commonly used to describe subatomic particles and their associated wave fields. In a gauge theory there is a group of transformations of the field variables (gauge transformations) that leaves the basic physics of the quantum field unchanged. This condition, called gauge invariance, gives the theory a certain symmetry, which governs its equations. In short, the structure of the group of gauge transformations in a particular gauge theory entails general restrictions on the way in which the field described by that theory can interact with other fields and elementary particles.

      The classical theory of the electromagnetic field, proposed by the British physicist James Clerk Maxwell (Maxwell, James Clerk) in 1864, is the prototype of gauge theories, though the concept of gauge transformation was not fully developed until the early 20th century by the German mathematician Hermann Weyl (Weyl, Hermann). In Maxwell's theory the basic field variables are the strengths of the electric and magnetic fields, which may be described in terms of auxiliary variables (e.g., the scalar and vector potentials). The gauge transformations in this theory consist of certain alterations in the values of those potentials that do not result in a change of the electric and magnetic fields. This gauge invariance is preserved in the modern theory of electromagnetism called quantum electrodynamics (q.v.), or QED. Modern work on gauge theories began with the attempt of the American physicists Chen Ning Yang (Yang, Chen Ning) and Robert L. Mills (1954) to formulate a gauge theory of the strong interaction (strong force). The group of gauge transformations in this theory dealt with the isospin (q.v.) of strongly interacting particles. In the late 1960s Steven Weinberg, Sheldon Glashow, and Abdus Salam developed a gauge theory that treats electromagnetic and weak interactions (weak force) in a unified manner. This theory, now commonly called the electroweak theory, has had notable success and is widely accepted. During the mid-1970s much work was done toward developing quantum chromodynamics (QCD), a gauge theory of the interactions between quarks (see quark). For various theoretical reasons, the concept of gauge invariance seems fundamental, and many physicists believe that the final unification of the fundamental interactions (i.e., gravitational, electromagnetic, strong, and weak) will be achieved by a gauge theory. See also quantum field theory.

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Universalium. 2010.

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