Eötvös, József, Báró

▪ Hungarian writer
born Sept. 13, 1813, Buda, Hung.
died Feb. 2, 1871, Pest
 novelist, essayist, educator, and statesman, whose life and writings were devoted to the creation of a modern Hungarian literature and to the establishment of a modern democratic Hungary.

      During his studies in Buda (1826–31), Eötvös became inspired with liberalism and the desire to reform Hungarian society. Between 1836 and 1841 he studied social conditions in England and France and returned deeply impressed by liberal philanthropy, Romanticism, and Utopian socialism.

      Eötvös proclaimed the social mission of literature and in all his writings fought for alleviation of poverty. His first novel, A karthausi (1839–41; “The Carthusians”), expresses disappointment at the July Revolution in France (1830); Eötvös intended it as a criticism of feudalism in Hungary. His essays and prose works also advocated a modernized penal code and an end to poverty. A falu jegyzője (1845; The Village Notary, 1850) bitterly satirized old Hungary, and a historical novel about the 16th-century Hungarian peasant rebellion, Magyarország 1514-ben (1847; “Hungary in 1514”) mobilized public opinion against serfdom.

      Eötvös became minister of education in the revolutionary government of 1848, but disagreement with Lajos Kossuth caused him to resign later that year. Until 1851 he lived in Munich, where he began his great work, A tizenkilencedik század uralkodó eszméinek befolyása az álladalomra (1851–54; “The Influence of the Ruling Ideas of the 19th Century on the State”). This work attempted to work out the principles of the French Revolution and depicted an ideal liberal state, based on English constitutional ideas and practice. Eötvös wished to base the relationship between Austria and Hungary on the principles of 1848, and the compromise of 1867 was partly his work.

      His later years were devoted to political and philosophical activity. His collected reflections (published 1864) show a growing stoicism of a type peculiar to Hungarian literature of the post-revolutionary period. He played a distinguished part in the reorganization of the Hungarian Academy and maintained close relations with Western scholars. Eötvös became minister of education again after 1867 and devoted his energies to modernizing the educational system.

      After the revolution, Eötvös wrote no poetry and only one novel, Nővérek (1857; “The Sisters”), which explained his ideas on education. Yet his literary work is of great importance. His short stories mark the beginning of a new portrayal of the peasant in Hungarian literature, and at a time when the Romantic novel was in fashion he was a pioneer of Realism.

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Universalium. 2010.

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