Doors, the

▪ American rock group
Introduction

      American band that, with a string of hits in the late 1960s and early 1970s, was the creative vehicle for singer Jim Morrison, one of rock music's mythic figures. The members were Morrison (in full James Douglas Morrison; b. Dec. 8, 1943, Melbourne, Fla., U.S.—d. July 3, 1971, Paris, France), Ray Manzarek (b. Feb. 12, 1935, Chicago, Ill., U.S.), Robby Krieger (b. Jan. 8, 1946, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.), and John Densmore (b. Dec. 1, 1945, Los Angeles).

      The Doors' instrumentalists—keyboardist Manzarek, guitarist Krieger, and drummer Densmore—combined backgrounds in classical music and blues with the improvisational daring of a jazz band. It was the dark-edged eroticism of Morrison's baritone and pseudo-poetic lyrics, however, that set the Los Angeles-based quartet apart from the prevailing hippie utopianism that pervaded West Coast rock in the late 1960s. Morrison's early death only enhanced his reputation as the quintessential rock showman and troubled artiste for subsequent generations.

      Morrison and Manzarek, acquaintances from the film school of the University of California (California, University of) at Los Angeles, conceived the group after the singer recited one of his poems to the keyboardist on a southern California beach. Morrison took the band's name from Aldous Huxley (Huxley, Aldous)'s book on mescaline, The Doors of Perception, which in turn referred to a line in a poem by William Blake (Blake, William). The Doors acquired a reputation for pushing the boundaries of rock composition, both musically and lyrically, in performances on Sunset Strip in Los Angeles. Their breakthrough hit, “Light My Fire,” was an anthem in 1967, but it was songs such as “The End”—an 11-minute Oedipal drama with sexually explicit lyrics and a swirling, ebb-and-flow arrangement—that established the Doors' reputation as one of rock's most potent, controversial, and theatrical acts. Indeed, the group was banned from the Whisky-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles after an early performance of the song.

      Though the group's ambitious music encompassed everything from Chicago blues to German cabaret, their string of pop hits caused them to be dismissed by some critics as a teenybopper act; this deeply troubled Morrison, who craved acceptance as a serious artist. By the time of the release of the Doors' third album, Waiting for the Sun (1968), Morrison had created a shamanistic alter ego for himself, the Lizard King; the singer's poem “The Celebration of the Lizard King” was printed inside the record jacket. His concert performances were marked by increasingly outrageous stunts, and Morrison was arrested in 1969 for exposing himself onstage in Miami. The charges were eventually dropped, but the incident served notice of Morrison's physical decline, in part because of his addiction to alcohol.

      The singer took increasing solace in his poetry, some of which was published, and the group's tours became less frequent. The Doors reestablished their artistic credibility with the blues-steeped Morrison Hotel (1970), but after the quartet's sixth studio release, L.A. Woman (1971), Morrison retreated to Paris, where he hoped to pursue a literary career. Instead, he died there of heart failure in 1971 at age 27. Without Morrison, the Doors produced two undistinguished albums before breaking up. They reunited briefly in 1978 to record An American Prayer, providing backing music for poetry Morrison recorded before his death. Manzarek also produced albums for the punk band X.

      In death Morrison was lionized by generations of fans, both as a youth icon and as an influence on singers such as Iggy Pop (Iggy and the Stooges), Echo and the Bunnymen's Ian McCulloch, and Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder. The Doors' releases have continued to sell in the millions, and The Doors, a 1991 movie directed by Oliver Stone, was a critical and popular success. The Doors were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

Greg Kot

Representative Works

The Doors (1967)
Strange Days (1967)
● “Light My Fire” (1967)
● “The Unknown Soldier” (1968)
● “Hello, I Love You” (1968)
● “Riders on the Storm” (1971)
L.A. Woman (1971)

Additional Reading
Jim Morrison, The Lords, and the New Creatures: Poems (1970, reissued 1987), the first volume of Morrison's verse to be published, is earnest, frequently graphic, and by turns dark, sophomoric, and exuberant. Biographies of Morrison and the Doors include Jerry Hopkins and Daniel Sugerman, No One Here Gets Out Alive (1980, reissued 1997), one of the cornerstones of the Morrison myth-building empire but also the best and most revealing chronicle of the band's history; and James Riordan and Jerry Prochnicky, Break on Through: The Life and Death of Jim Morrison (1991).

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Universalium. 2010.

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