Dirʿīyah, Battle of ad-

Arabia [1818]
      (1818), major defeat dealt the Wahhābīs (Wahhābī), fanatical and puritanical Muslim reformers of Najd, central Arabia, by the forces of the Egyptian ruler Muḥammad ʿAlī Pasha; the Wahhābī empire was destroyed, and the Saʿūdī family that created it was virtually wiped out.

      Wahhābī attacks on pilgrim caravans crossing Arabia concerned the Ottoman Turkish government at the end of the 18th century (the Ottoman sultan was protector of Mecca, Islām's chief holy city). When the Ottomans attempted to invade al-Ḥasāʾ, eastern Arabia, the Wahhābīs responded by seizing the holy city of Karbalāʾ in Turkish Iraq (1801), then capturing Mecca itself (1802). Preoccupied in other directions, the Sultan did not send another force into Arabia until 1811, when he consigned to Muḥammad ʿAlī Pasha, the virtually independent viceroy of Egypt, the task of crushing the “heretics.” For the next four years, the balance of power shifted back and forth between Muḥammad ʿAlī and Saʿūd.

      In 1815 Saʿūd's successor, ʿAbd Allāh I, sued for peace, and the Egyptians withdrew from Najd. The following year, however, Ibrāhīm (Ibrahim Pasha) Pasha, one of the Viceroy's sons, took command of the Egyptian forces. Gaining the support of the volatile Arabian tribes by skillful diplomacy and lavish gifts, he advanced into central Arabia to occupy the towns of ʿUnayzah, Buraydah, and Shaqrāʾ. Joined now by most of the principal tribes—Ḥarb, ʿUnayzah, Muṭayr, Banū Khālid—he appeared before the Wahhābī capital ad-Dirʿīyah in April 1818. After six months of intermittent and desperate fighting, ʿAbd Allāh surrendered (Sept. 9, 1818) and was sent to Constantinople, where he was beheaded. Ad-Dirʿīyah was razed to the ground, and Egyptian garrisons were posted to the principal towns. Several members of the Saʿūdī family managed to escape before the surrender; the rest were sent to Egypt to prison.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Saudi Arabia — a kingdom in N and central Arabia, including Hejaz, Nejd, and dependencies. 20,087,965; ab. 600,000 sq. mi. (1,554,000 sq. km). Cap.: Riyadh. Cf. Mecca. * * * Saudi Arabia Introduction Saudi Arabia Background: In 1902 Abd al Aziz Ibn SAUD… …   Universalium

  • Nejd — or Najd (literally highland , ar. نجد) is the central region of the Arabian Peninsula. Geography Boundaries of NejdThe Arabic word nejd literally means upland and was once applied to a variety of regions within the Arabian Peninsula. However, the …   Wikipedia

  • Arabia, history of — Introduction       history of the region from prehistoric times to the present.       Some time after the rise of Islam in the first quarter of the 7th century AD and the emergence of the Arabian (Arab) Muslims as the founders of one of the great …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.