Courci, John de

▪ Anglo-Norman conqueror
died September 1219?

      Anglo-Norman conqueror of Ulster, who was a member of a celebrated Norman family of Oxfordshire and Somerset.

      Sent to Ireland with William FitzAldelm by Henry II in 1176, he immediately led an expedition from Dublin to Ulster and in 1177 seized its capital, Down (now Downpatrick). He subsequently gained effective control of eastern Ulster, and his firm rule there was responsible for the early prosperity of the area.

      John de Courci had a perennial feud with the de Lacys, another Anglo-Norman family adventuring in Ireland, and the younger Hugh de Lacy (later 1st earl of Ulster) took and held him prisoner for a short while in 1204. De Courci, perhaps by a refusal of homage, had angered King John, who in May 1205 granted Ulster to Hugh with the title of earl. De Courci, with his brother-in-law, Reginald, king of Man (the Isle of Man), laid siege to the castle of Rath (possibly Dundrum) but was routed by Hugh's elder brother, Walter de Lacy, lord of Meath. He disappeared until 1207, when he received permission to return to England. He accompanied King John to Ireland in 1210 and seems thereafter to have retained his favour.

      Both John de Courci and his wife, Affreca, were benefactors of the church and founded monasteries in Ulster. John replaced the secular canons of Down priory with Benedictine monks from St. Werburgh's abbey, Chester.

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Universalium. 2010.

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