Conservative Party of Canada

French  Parti Conservateur du Canada 

      conservative Canadian political party. The party was formed in 2003 by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party (Progressive Conservative Party of Canada). The idea for a merger of Canada's main conservative parties arose in the 1990s when national support for the Progressive Conservatives dwindled and the Reform Party (later the Canadian Alliance) was unable to expand its national support beyond its base in western Canada. Following the third successive election victory of the Liberal Party of Canada in 2000, support for establishing a united conservative party increased, and in December 2003 more than 90 percent of the members of both the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservatives endorsed a merger. The Conservative Party of Canada was officially registered with Elections Canada (an independent agency established by the Canadian Parliament to regulate elections and political parties) on December 8, 2003.

      In 2004, in its first federal general election, the party won nearly 30 percent of the vote and 99 seats in the House of Commons, emerging as the official opposition to a Liberal minority government. In the subsequent election of January 2006, the Conservatives were elected to lead a minority government, and their leader, Stephen Harper (Harper, Stephen), became prime minister. Harper proved adept at coalition building, and in November 2006 he co-opted members of the opposition Bloc Québécois with a motion that recognized the distinct national identity of the Québécois people while still asserting Quebec's place in a united Canada. Hoping to build on those gains, Harper called early federal elections for October 2008, but the Conservatives failed to gain a parliamentary majority, though they added 19 seats to their to 2006 election results, reaching a total of 143 seats and remaining a minority government.

      The party generally supports conservative social and economic policies, a strong federal system of government, and the use of Canada's armed forces in international peacekeeping missions.

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Universalium. 2010.

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