Colossians, The Letter of Paul to the

▪ work by Saint Paul
also called  The Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Colossians 

       New Testament writing addressed to Christians at Colossae, Asia Minor, whose congregation was founded by Paul's colleague Epaphras. The developed theology of the letter, many believe, indicates that it was composed by Paul (Paul, the Apostle, Saint) in Rome about AD 62 rather than during an earlier imprisonment. Some question Pauline authorship on the basis of vocabulary.

      The Colossians were apparently adopting proto-gnostic (Gnosticism) and syncretistic (religious syncretism) views and practices that were incompatible with “the knowledge of God's mystery, of Christ (Jesus Christ), in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (2:2–3). Though there are references to such things as philosophy and empty deceit (2:8), Jewish-like practices (2:16), visions (2:18), and “rigour of devotion and self-abasement and severity to the body” (2:23), the source of these teachings is not quite clear. The author strives to curb such tendencies by recalling the preeminence of Christ in everything (1:18), because Christ is “the image of the invisible God” (1:15), who reconciled man to God “by the blood of his cross” (1:20). Paul then exhorts the Christian community to put away anger, malice, and foul talk and to show kindness, meekness, patience, forgiveness, and love in imitation of Christ. Every Christian, according to his state in life, should fulfill his duties.

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Universalium. 2010.

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