Chopper chopping-tool industry

▪ prehistoric technology
      certain stone tool traditions of Asia, probably of later Pleistocene age, characterized by roughly worked pebble chopper (q.v.) tools. These traditions include the Choukoutienian industry of China (associated with Homo erectus), the Patjitanian industry of Java, the Soan industry of India, and the Anyathian industry of Myanmar (Burma).

      Stone with good fracture qualities—such as flint, jasper, and chert—was not always as readily available in Asia as it was elsewhere in the world. Asian populations, therefore, depended on coarse-grained quartz, volcanic tuff, and petrified wood, none of which lends itself to fine tool fabrication. The lack of good material may explain why stone toolmaking did not evolve in Asia. Choppers and chopping tools were still being made, for example, by Solo man of Asia, while his European contemporary, Neanderthal man, was able to manufacture hand axes, borers, and knives, as well as choppers.

      The characteristic tools of the Chopper chopping-tool industry were the chopper, with a single straight or curved cutting edge flaked from a pebble or from a chunk of stone; the chopping tool, with a bifacial cutting edge flaked, again, from a pebble or chunk of stone; and the hand adze (adz), shaped from a block of stone, with a rounded butt and a single-bevel straight or curved cutting edge. Stone scrapers, cleavers, and points were also fashioned, and some tools were made of bone.

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Universalium. 2010.

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