Chilkat weaving

▪ American Indian art
      narrowly, the robes, or blankets, woven by the Chilkat, northernmost of the Pacific Coast Indians (Native American) of North America. The Chilkat comprise a family within the Tlingit language group on the Alaskan coast between Cape Fox and Yakutat Bay. More generally, the term “Chilkat weaving” applies to any garment woven by these peoples. Although the Chilkat are not the only Native Americans who make this type of robe, they have woven the majority of robes in the period since European contact and have created the finest quality and design.

      The Chilkat robe is roughly rectangular in shape, except for a V-shaped bottom side; fringe decorates the bottom and sides. Twine made from cedar bark forms the warp (vertical threads), and mountain goat or mountain sheep wool forms the weft (horizontal interlacing threads), a weave probably borrowed from the Tsimshian Indians. The colours—usually white, yellow, black, and blue or green—come from natural dyes.

      The designs on the earliest Chilkat robes were painted, but for the last two centuries they have been woven into the fabric by Chilkat women, following designs painted on boards by the men. As in many Native American groups, only men are permitted to create designs depicting living creatures. Women typically add abstract symbols that represent animals or spirits associated with the tribe to which the owner of the robe belongs. As in almost all of their art, the Indians of the Northwest Coast attempt to portray a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface by presenting all of the different perspectives of the object. For example, progressing from left to right on a Chilkat robe would be a panel depicting the left profile of a whale, then a panel containing a head-on view, and finally a panel showing the right profile. Above this tripartite representation there might be an X-ray-like depiction of the inside of the whale. The artist indicates which animal he has woven into the robe by using key features, such as a long snout for a wolf or a short snout for a bear.

      The Chilkat also weave knee-length shirts that are similar in design to the robe, leggings, and dance aprons.

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Universalium. 2010.

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