chief rabbinate

      in Judaism, a supreme religious authority whose decisions bind all those under its jurisdiction. The prototype of the chief rabbinate was the Great sanhedrin of Jerusalem, which, until the destruction of the Second Temple in AD 70, issued legislation and interpreted Jewish Law for all the Jewish people. The Patriarchate functioned with Roman support until about 425, since which Jewry has had no central authority. Various Jewish communities, however, have seen the practical advantages of having a chief rabbi even though, technically speaking, the religious authority of all rabbis is equal. The need, moreover, for some kind of national Jewish authority has often been recognized by both Jews and governments to protect Jewish interests and facilitate relations between non-Jewish governments and large Jewish populations. Sometimes Jews resented appointments by secular authorities when the choice seemed to have been made with a desire to manipulate the Jewish community.

      The most important chief rabbinate today is that in Israel. It has two chief rabbis, one representing the Sephardic (Spanish-rite) community, the other the Ashkenazi (German- rite) Jews. Its chief responsibility, first granted in 1921 under British rule, is to handle all cases of personal status (marriage, divorce). This task was greatly complicated when large numbers of Diaspora Jews migrated to Israel after 1948. Since they had lived in foreign lands for many generations, it was not clear that they had observed rabbinic laws regarding marriage and divorce. Their right, therefore, to marry any Jew of their choice was called into question. In 1964 all such Jews were, as a group, recognized as true Jews, but the chief rabbinate still retained the right to decide the legitimacy of individual marriages.

      In England the office of rabbi of the United Synagogue of Great Britain has come to be recognized as equivalent to that of a chief rabbi for that country. French Jewry operates under a system of consistories devised by Napoleon in 1807, but the grand rabbin is no longer under government control. Germany followed the pattern of France to some extent, but without a central authority.

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Universalium. 2010.

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