cenobitic monasticism

▪ ecclesiastical institution
      form of monasticism based on “life in common” (Greek koinobion), characterized by strict discipline, regular worship, and manual work. St. Pachomius (Pachomius, Saint) was the author of the first cenobitic rule, which was later developed by St. Basil the Great (c. 329–379). Cenobitic monasticism was introduced in the West by St. Benedict of Nursia and became the norm of the Benedictine order. In the East its major centres were the monastery of Stoudios in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Tur.) and several monastic communities on Mount Athos, in Greece. Compare idiorrhythmic monasticism.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • monasticism — /meuh nas teuh siz euhm/, n. the monastic system, condition, or mode of life. [1785 95; MONASTIC + ISM] * * * Institutionalized religious movement whose members are bound by vows to an ascetic life of prayer, meditation, or good works. Members of …   Universalium

  • Monasticism — Trappist monk praying in his cell. Monasticism (from Greek μοναχός, monachos, derived from Greek monos, alone) is a religious way of life characterized by the practice of renouncing worldly pursuits to fully devote one s self to spiritual work.… …   Wikipedia

  • idiorrhythmic monasticism — ▪ Christianity also called  eremitic monasticism (from Greek eremos, “desert”)        the original form of monastic life in Christianity, as exemplified by St. Anthony of Egypt (Anthony of Egypt, Saint) (c. 250–355). It consisted of a total… …   Universalium

  • Buddhist monasticism — Monasticism is one of the most fundamental institutions of Buddhism. Monks and nuns are responsible for preserving and spreading Buddhist teachings, as well as educating and guiding Buddhist lay followers. The ultimate goal of Buddhist… …   Wikipedia

  • Christian monasticism — Icon of Saint Anthony the Great, the founder of Christian monasticism. Christian monasticism is a practice which began to develop early in the history of the Christian Church, modeled upon scriptural examples and ideals, including those in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Eastern Monasticism Before Chalcedon —     Eastern Monasticism Before Chalcedon (A.D. 451)     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Eastern Monasticism Before Chalcedon (A.D. 451)     Egypt was the Motherland of Christian monasticism. It sprang into existence there at the beginning of the fourth …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Christian monasticism before 451 — Eastern Christian monasticism developed for around a century and a half, and as a spontaneous religious movement, up to the time of the Council of Chalcedon, which took place in 451. At that Council, monasticism had become an acknowledged part of …   Wikipedia

  • Degrees of Eastern Orthodox monasticism — Part of a series on Eastern Christianity …   Wikipedia

  • Cenobite — Cenobium redirects here. For the colony of algae, see Coenobium. coenobitism redirects here. For other uses, see coenobitism (disambiguation). For other meanings, see Cenobite (Hellraiser) and Cenobites (album). Coptic icon of Pachomius the Great …   Wikipedia

  • Eastern Orthodoxy — the faith, practice, membership, and government of the Eastern Orthodox Church. * * * officially Orthodox Catholic Church One of the three major branches of Christianity. Its adherents live mostly in Greece, Russia, the Balkans, Ukraine, and the… …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.