Caraway, Hattie Ophelia

▪ United States senator
née  Hattie Ophelia Wyatt 
born Feb. 1, 1878, near Bakerville, Tenn., U.S.
died Dec. 21, 1950, Falls Church, Va.
 American politician who became the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate.

      Hattie Wyatt grew up in her native Bakerville, Tennessee, and in nearby Hustburg. She graduated (1896) from Dickson Normal School and for a time thereafter taught school. In 1902 she married Thaddeus H. Caraway, who subsequently became a congressman and then a U.S. senator for Arkansas.

      When Thaddeus died in November 1931 Hattie Caraway was appointed by the governor to fill her husband's seat until a special election could be held; she thereby became the second woman (after Rebecca Felton (Felton, Rebecca Ann), 1922) to be seated in the U.S. Senate. She won a special election (January 1932) to fill the few remaining months of her late husband's term. She won reelection in her own right to the seat later in 1932 with the help of Louisiana governor Huey Long (Long, Huey), who campaigned for her. Caraway was reelected again in 1938 but failed in her bid for a third term in 1944. In her 13 years in the Senate, she was the first woman to preside over a session of that body and the first to serve as a committee chairman.

      In her voting Caraway generally supported the New Deal and other legislation of the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; she opposed isolationism, supported veterans and organized labour, and in 1943 became the first woman in Congress to cosponsor the Equal Rights Amendment. Her reelection in 1938 after a primary victory over Representative John L. McClellan firmly established her as a senator in her own right, and her dry humour and homely sayings made her a favourite national figure. In the 1944 Democratic primary in Arkansas she was defeated by Representative J. William Fulbright, and she left the Senate in 1945.

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Universalium. 2010.

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