branch and twig borer

insect
also called false powder post-borers 
 any of approximately 700 species of beetles (insect order Coleoptera) that live in dry wood or under tree bark. Branch and twig borers range in size from 3 to 20 mm (0.1 to 0.8 inch). However, the palm borer (Dinapate wrighti) of western North America, is about 50 mm long. The apple twig, or grape cane, borer (Amphicerus bicaudatus) bores into living fruit-tree branches and grape vines but breeds in dead wood. The lead-cable borer, or short-circuit beetle (Scobicia declivis), bores into the lead covering of older telephone cables. Moisture entering through the hole can cause short circuits. This beetle lives in oak, maple, or other trees and does not feed on the cable sheathing.

      The psoid branch and twig beetles (subfamily Psoinae) differ from the bostrichids in having a large head that is visible from above. The adults are black or brown and range from 14 to 28 mm. The larvae bore through the heartwood. The spotted-limb borer (Psoa maculata) breeds only in dead wood, and the genus Polycaon is often destructive in orchards.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Twig — Twig, n. [AS. twig; akin to D. twijg, OHG. zwig, zwi, G. zweig, and probably to E. two.] A small shoot or branch of a tree or other plant, of no definite length or size. [1913 Webster] The Britons had boats made of willow twigs, covered on the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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