Boccanegra Family

▪ Genoese family
      wealthy Genoese family that played an important role in two great “popular” (democratic) revolutions, one in 1257 and the other in 1339, and furnished several admirals to the Genoese republic and to Spain.

      Guglielmo Boccanegra (d. 1274) became virtual dictator of Genoa in 1257, when an insurrection against the government of the old aristocracy made him captain of the people. The major accomplishment of his administration was the conclusion with the Byzantine emperor Michael VIII Palaeologus of the Treaty of Nymphaeum in 1261, an offensive-defensive alliance that opened up the Black Sea and the Byzantine Empire to Genoese commerce. Later the same year Guglielmo's brother Marino, commanding a Genoese fleet, helped the Byzantines to recover Constantinople from Venice. In 1262 Genoese nobles overthrew Guglielmo; his brother Lanfranco was killed in the insurrection, and Guglielmo was condemned to perpetual exile. The command of the fleet was taken from Marino and divided among the noble families. The lack of unified command caused disaffection with Constantinople, which retaliated by nullifying many of the advantages won by the Treaty of Nymphaeum.

      In 1339 another popular revolution resulted in the election of Simone Boccanegra (1301–63), descendant of Guglielmo's brother Lanfranco, as the first Genoese doge. Deposed in 1344, Simone fled with his family to Pisa, returning to office in 1356 with the aid of the Visconti, the rulers of Milan. According to tradition, he was poisoned at a banquet in 1363. An opera by Giuseppe Verdi, Simon Boccanegra, is based on his story.

      Simone's brother Egidio (d. 1367), grand admiral in the service of Alfonso XI of Castile, inflicted a memorable defeat on a Moroccan fleet off Algeciras in 1344. He was succeeded by his son Ambrogio, who in 1371 won two naval victories, one against the Portuguese at the mouth of the Tagus River and the other against an English fleet three times more numerous at the Battle of La Rochelle, in which the English admiral, the Earl of Pembroke, was taken prisoner.

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Universalium. 2010.

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