Althusser, Louis

▪ French scholar
born October 16, 1918, Birmandreis, Algeria
died October 22, 1990, near Paris, France

      French philosopher who attained international renown in the 1960s for his attempt to fuse Marxism and structuralism.

      Inducted into the French army in 1939, Althusser was captured by German troops in 1940 and spent the remainder of the war in a German prisoner of war camp. In 1948 he joined the French Communist Party (PCF); in the same year, he was appointed to the faculty of the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, where he taught for nearly three decades and influenced generations of students.

      In his two major works on the philosophy of Karl Marx (Marx, Karl) (1818–83), For Marx and Reading Capital (both published in 1965), Althusser sought to counter the prevalent interpretation of Marxism as an essentially “humanistic” and “individualist” philosophy in which history is a goal-directed process aimed at the realization and fulfillment of human nature under communism. Althusser asserted that this “Hegelian” interpretation overemphasized the early Marx, who had not yet overcome the “ideological” delusions of Hegelian philosophy, and neglected the mature Marx of Capital (1867) and other works, in which he attempts to develop a new “science” of history focused not on human beings but on the impersonal historical processes of which human beings are the bearers. Borrowing from the work of the French philosophers of science Gaston Bachelard (1884–1962) and Georges Canguilhem (1904–95), Althusser characterized the profound difference between Marx's early philosophical views and his later scientific ones as an “epistemological break.” In a later influential essay, "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses" (1969), Althusser argued against traditional interpretations of Marx as an inveterate economic determinist by demonstrating the “quasi-autonomous” role accorded to politics, law, and ideology in Marx's later writings.

      For Althusser, historical change depended on “objective” factors such as the relationship between forces and relations of production; questions of “consciousness” were always of secondary importance. His emphasis on the historical process over the historical subject in Marx complemented efforts by French structuralists—including Claude Lévi-Strauss (Lévi-Strauss, Claude), Roland Barthes (Barthes, Roland) (1915–80), Michel Foucault (Foucault, Michel) (1926–84), and Jacques Lacan (Lacan, Jacques) (1901–81)—to vanquish the “subjectivist” paradigm of existential Phenomenology represented by Jean-Paul Sartre (Sartre, Jean-Paul) (1905–80) and Maurice Merleau-Ponty (Merleau-Ponty, Maurice) (1908–61). His writings also rendered an important service to the struggling PCF. By recasting Marxist thought in the idiom of the dominant intellectual paradigm of structuralism, he was able to convince a new generation of intellectuals in France and abroad of Marxism's continued relevance. Ironically, Althusser's efforts were little appreciated by the leadership of the PCF, which tended to regard any sign of intellectual independence among party members as a threat. In 1974 Althusser felt compelled to write an extended self-criticism for his purported “theoreticist deviation” ( "Elements of Self-Criticism" ).

      In November 1980 Althusser suffered a mental breakdown and strangled to death his wife of some 30 years, Hélène Rytmann. Judged unfit to stand trial (he had suffered from manic depression throughout his adult life), he was institutionalized for several years. For some observers the tragic incident symbolized the obsolescence of “structuralist Marxism.” Althusser's confessional autobiography, The Future Lasts Forever, was published posthumously in 1992.

Richard Wolin
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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