Quine, Willard Van Orman

▪ 2001

      American logician and philosopher (b. June 25, 1908, Akron, Ohio—d. Dec. 25, 2000, Boston, Mass.), was a major figure in Anglo-American analytic philosophy. Quine majored in mathematics at Oberlin (Ohio) College (1926–30) before earning his Ph.D. (1932) in philosophy from Harvard University; his dissertation in symbolic logic was supervised by Alfred North Whitehead. In 1932–33 Quine traveled as a Sheldon traveling fellow to Vienna, Prague, and Warsaw, where he met logicians Alfred Tarski and Kurt Gödel, as well as Rudolf Carnap, Moritz Schlick, and other members of the Vienna Circle of logical positivists, whose ideas achieved great influence in Great Britain and the U.S. After three years as a junior fellow at Harvard, Quine joined the faculty in 1936, and, except for the years he served (1942–46) in the U.S. Navy, where he deciphered German submarine codes, he remained there until he retired in 1978. Quine's early writings were on logic, but he turned to more general philosophical concerns in the late 1940s. His 1951 paper “Two Dogmas of Empiricism” attacked the distinction between analytic statements (whose truth depends on the synonymy of the terms in it) and synthetic statements (whose truth depends on correspondence with experience), which was accepted by logical positivists and other analytic philosophers. Quine argued that synonymy cannot be established independently of analyticity, and that the distinction therefore collapses. Consequently, all statements are dependent on experience. The paper established his reputation, and its conclusion reflected Quine's thoroughgoing empiricism, in which even the most abstract statements of logic, mathematics, and philosophy must ultimately be tested by experience. Among his many books were Mathematical Logic (1940), From a Logical Point of View (1953), Word and Object (1960), and his autobiography, The Time of My Life (1985).

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▪ American philosopher
born June 25, 1908, Akron, Ohio, U.S.
died December 25, 2000, Boston, Massachusetts

      American logician (logic, history of) and philosopher, widely considered one of the dominant figures in Anglo-American philosophy in the last half of the 20th century.

      After studying mathematics and logic at Oberlin College (1926–30), Quine won a scholarship to Harvard University, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1932. On a traveling fellowship to Europe in 1932–33, he met some of the leading philosophers and logicians of the day, including Rudolf Carnap (Carnap, Rudolf) and Alfred Tarski (Tarski, Alfred). After three years as a junior fellow at Harvard, Quine joined the faculty in 1936. From 1942 to 1945 he served as a naval intelligence officer in Washington, D.C. Promoted to full professor at Harvard in 1948, he remained there until 1978, when he retired.

      Quine produced highly original and important work in several areas of philosophy, including logic, ontology, epistemology, and the philosophy of language. By the 1950s he had developed a comprehensive and systematic philosophical outlook that was naturalistic, empiricist, and behaviourist. Conceiving of philosophy as an extension of science, he rejected epistemological foundationalism, the attempt to ground knowledge of the external world in allegedly transcendent and self-validating mental experience. The proper task of a “naturalized epistemology,” as he saw it, was simply to give a psychological account of how scientific knowledge is actually obtained.

      Although much influenced by the Logical Positivism of Carnap and other members of the Vienna Circle, Quine famously rejected one of that group's cardinal doctrines, the analytic-synthetic distinction. According to this doctrine, there is a fundamental difference between statements such as “All bachelors are unmarried,” which are true or false solely by virtue of the meanings of the terms they contain, and statements such as “All swans are white,” which are true or false by virtue of nonlinguistic facts about the world. Quine argued that no coherent definition of analyticity had ever been proposed. One consequence of his view was that the truths of mathematics and logic, which the positivists had regarded as analytic, and the empirical truths of science differed only in “degree” and not kind. In keeping with his empiricism, Quine held that both the former and the latter were known through experience and were thus in principle revisable in the face of countervailing evidence.

      In ontology, Quine recognized only those entities that it was necessary to postulate in order to assume that our best scientific theories are true—specifically, concrete physical objects and abstract sets, which were required by the mathematics used in many scientific disciplines. He rejected notions such as properties, propositions, and meanings as ill-defined or scientifically useless.

      In the philosophy of language (language, philosophy of), Quine was known for his behaviourist account of language learning and for his thesis of the “indeterminacy of translation.” This is the view that there are always indefinitely many possible translations of one language into another, each of which is equally compatible with the totality of empirical evidence available to linguistic investigators. There is thus no “fact of the matter” about which translation of a language is correct. The indeterminacy of translation is an instance of a more general view, which Quine called “ontological relativity,” that claims that for any given scientific theory there are always indefinitely many alternatives entailing different ontological assumptions but accounting for all available evidence equally well. Thus, it does not make sense to say that one theory rather than another gives a true description of the world.

      Among Quine's many books are Word and Object (1960), The Roots of Reference (1974), and his autobiography, The Time of My Life (1985).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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